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dangerousdungeons:chapter10 [2019/05/29 20:14]
robertfreemanday created
dangerousdungeons:chapter10 [2019/06/21 23:30] (current)
robertfreemanday Formatting clean up
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 - H.P. Lovecraft - H.P. Lovecraft
  
-     __**Celephais**__+__**Celephais**__
  
  
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- Those readers familiar with real-world military engineering may be familiar with the design triad for tanks: Armor, Firepower and Mobility. For instance, one cannot hope to build a very mobile tank with a lot of armor and a large gun. Likewise, a tank with a lot of armor is not going to be very mobile in the field. With that in mind, the __OSRIC__ GM who is constructing a setting for his or her game would do well to consider the following Worldbuilding Design Triad: Functionality, Realism, and Adaptability in order to craft a top notch setting from scratch. +Those readers familiar with real-world military engineering may be familiar with the design triad for tanks: Armor, Firepower and Mobility. For instance, one cannot hope to build a very mobile tank with a lot of armor and a large gun. Likewise, a tank with a lot of armor is not going to be very mobile in the field. With that in mind, the __OSRIC__ GM who is constructing a setting for his or her game would do well to consider the following Worldbuilding Design Triad: Functionality, Realism, and Adaptability in order to craft a top notch setting from scratch. 
  
- Functionality in setting design encompasses design considerations like how fun the setting will be for the players and GM, how durable the setting is for long-term campaign play and how suitable the setting is for the rules being used (in this case, __OSRIC__). Ideally, the GM's goal is to present a challenging setting for the players. In order to fully meet player expectations a good setting must include opportunities for player character development in several directions while also offering up appropriate rewards. While some might enjoy reading about a "dark and gritty" setting with very low levels of magic and treasure - players in a roleplaying game like OSRIC rarely enjoy grinding their way through adventures only to find they cannot make meaningful progress or that their actions had only a very limited impact on the setting at large. With this in mind, it is important for the GM to provide a setting that matches the players' expectations by including game-specific opportunities for training and advancement and treasure and magic items commensurate with the risks taken to acquire them. At first, the GM may find that a single well designed village or small area may be enough to satisfy player needs. As the campaign progresses however, it will become necessary to construct larger areas - a city or an entire nation in which the characters can expand into high level activities like stronghold construction, domain management and extra-planar adventuring. +Functionality in setting design encompasses design considerations like how fun the setting will be for the players and GM, how durable the setting is for long-term campaign play and how suitable the setting is for the rules being used (in this case, __OSRIC__). Ideally, the GM's goal is to present a challenging setting for the players. In order to fully meet player expectations a good setting must include opportunities for player character development in several directions while also offering up appropriate rewards. While some might enjoy reading about a "dark and gritty" setting with very low levels of magic and treasure - players in a roleplaying game like OSRIC rarely enjoy grinding their way through adventures only to find they cannot make meaningful progress or that their actions had only a very limited impact on the setting at large. With this in mind, it is important for the GM to provide a setting that matches the players' expectations by including game-specific opportunities for training and advancement and treasure and magic items commensurate with the risks taken to acquire them. At first, the GM may find that a single well designed village or small area may be enough to satisfy player needs. As the campaign progresses however, it will become necessary to construct larger areas - a city or an entire nation in which the characters can expand into high level activities like stronghold construction, domain management and extra-planar adventuring. 
  
 The second consideration for the world-building GM is Realism. While by its very nature a fantasy role-playing game like OSRIC is not realistic - the very best settings like Gygax's Greyhawk, Stafford's Prax and Bledsaw's Wilderlands always include setting information that hightens the verisimilitude of the setting. Such considerations can encompass things like geography, weather, history and cultures that are consistently 'realistic' in that setting. GMs interested in hightening the realism of their own setting would be wise to borrow from real world history, natural science, culture and folklore as much as possible. while keeping in mind that the players do not simply expect to be tourists in the setting but active participants in their own right.  The second consideration for the world-building GM is Realism. While by its very nature a fantasy role-playing game like OSRIC is not realistic - the very best settings like Gygax's Greyhawk, Stafford's Prax and Bledsaw's Wilderlands always include setting information that hightens the verisimilitude of the setting. Such considerations can encompass things like geography, weather, history and cultures that are consistently 'realistic' in that setting. GMs interested in hightening the realism of their own setting would be wise to borrow from real world history, natural science, culture and folklore as much as possible. while keeping in mind that the players do not simply expect to be tourists in the setting but active participants in their own right. 
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 **The Wilderlands**: @795,000 square miles = a little bit bigger than the Mediterranean (970,000 sq. mi.) **The Wilderlands**: @795,000 square miles = a little bit bigger than the Mediterranean (970,000 sq. mi.)
  
- **The Forgotten Realms**: @9,500,000 square miles = @ three times bigger than Europe (3,930,000 sq. mi.) +**The Forgotten Realms**: @9,500,000 square miles = @ three times bigger than Europe (3,930,000 sq. mi.) 
  
  
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 **4. Determine a cultural motif for individual regional groups**. These motifs are largely based on real-world historical cultures. Following this the GM should  During play it will aid in player immersion if they have some preconceived notions about how such a culture behaves or is structured. Conversely, the GM could introduce completely fictional cultures into his or her campaign setting but in general, this will require a lot more background work on their part and later, during play will also require a lot of top-down explanation of setting details for the players - who presumably will not have access to the bulk of the setting background details.  **4. Determine a cultural motif for individual regional groups**. These motifs are largely based on real-world historical cultures. Following this the GM should  During play it will aid in player immersion if they have some preconceived notions about how such a culture behaves or is structured. Conversely, the GM could introduce completely fictional cultures into his or her campaign setting but in general, this will require a lot more background work on their part and later, during play will also require a lot of top-down explanation of setting details for the players - who presumably will not have access to the bulk of the setting background details. 
  
- If necessary, the GM can also make some notes on regional history, languages, religions etc. which might help guide their decisions later on. +If necessary, the GM can also make some notes on regional history, languages, religions etc. which might help guide their decisions later on. 
  
  
dangerousdungeons/chapter10.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/21 23:30 by robertfreemanday