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osric:chapter1

Chapter 1: Creating a Character

Ability Scores

A character's basic attributes are represented in the game by six “ability scores.” These abilities are Strength (Str), Dexterity (Dex), Constitution (Con), Intelligence (Int), Wisdom (Wis), and Charisma (Cha). The first three represent the character's physical qualities, and the second three his or her mental ones. Each of these abilities is represented by a number from 3-18, the higher the better. The Game Master (“GM”) will decide how you should generate these scores. For a truly brutal game, characters are generated using 3d6 for each ability in order. Because these numbers will be relatively low (compared to other methods for generating scores, described hereafter) and cannot be switched around, the players will be forced to use their utmost skill in creating a party of adventurers from whatever raw material the dice hand to them.

Many GMs will allow the players to roll up six ability scores and then decide which scores will go with which ability. This gives the players more flexibility to create a good party and to decide among themselves who will be playing which class. A player may come to the table wanting to play a particular type of character, and unless the gamers agree that they want to test their skills with a completely random challenge it is usually best to let the players take on the fantasy roles that satisfy them most.

As well as eliminating or reducing the randomness of a character's strengths and weaknesses, the GM may also allow players a bit of a numerical advantage. Many GMs permit ability scores to be rolled using 4d6, dropping the result of the lowest die. This method, obviously, will tend to result in higher scores.

Strength

Strength (“Str”) is a measure of physical power, and is the most important attribute for fighters. If a fighter, paladin, or ranger character rolls an 18 strength, the player then rolls a d%, and that number is added as a decimal, or percentage, to the 18 strength. (See the table below for details.) A roll of 00 on the percentage die indicates a strength score of 19. Members of other classes cannot naturally gain strength in excess of 18.

The following table summarises the bonuses and penalties for strength scores. Note that an “Extraordinary Success” indicates the possibility for extremely strong characters to perform exceptional or normally impossible feats of strength, such as opening a door which is held closed by some relatively minor magic rather than a lock.

Strength Ability Scores

STRENGTH BONUS TO HIT BONUS TO DAMAGE ENCUMBRANCE ADJUSTMENT (IN LBS) MINOR TESTS, E.G. FORCING DOORS (CHANCE ON D6) MAJOR TESTS, E.G. BENDING BARS AND LIFTING PORTCULLIS (CHANCE ON D%)
3 -3 -1 -35 1 0
4-5 -2 -1 -25 1 0
6-7 -1 0 -15 1 0
8-9 0 0 0 1-2 1
10-11 0 0 0 1-2 2
12-13 0 0 +10 1-2 4
14-15 0 0 +20 1-2 7
16 0 +1 +35 1-3 10
17 +1 +1 +50 1-3 13
18 +1 +2 +75 1-3 16
18.01-18.50 +1 +3 +100 1-3 20
18.51-18.75 +2 +3 +125 1-4 25
18.76-18.90 +2 +4 +150 1-4 30
18.91-18.99 +2 +5 +200 1-4 (1 in 6 extraordinary success) 35
19 +3 +6 +300 1-5 (1 in 6 extraordinary success) 40

Dexterity

Dexterity (“Dex”) is a measure of the character's speed, hand-eye coordination, and nimbleness of foot. It affects the accuracy of missile fire and the character's ability to dodge blows, so a high dexterity score can be extremely useful to characters of any class. It is the most important ability score for thieves.

Except in surprise situations, dexterity does not modify the initiative roll in melee combat. However, it may modify initiative in missile combat (see “Combat”).

Dexterity Ability Scores

Dexterity Score Surprise Bonus Missile Bonus to Hit AC Adjustment
3 -3 -3 +4
4 -2 -2 +3
5 -1 -1 +2
6 0 0 +1
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0
11 0 0 0
12 0 0 0
13 0 0 0
14 0 0 0
15 0 0 -1
16 +1 +1 -2
17 +2 +2 -3
18 +3 +3 -4
19 +3 +3 -4

Constitution

Constitution (“Con”) is a measure of the character's overall health and vitality. A high constitution score can give the character bonus hit points (“hp”), so it is a desirable score for any character class. Constitution is also important in two other regards, for it determines both a character's ability to survive being raised from the dead (Survive Resurrection/Raise Dead) and to survive a traumatic magical change in form, such as that caused by a polymorph spell (Survive System Shock).

Constitution Ability Scores

Constitution Score Hit Point Bonus per Die Survive Resurrection/ Raise Dead (d%) Survive System Shock (Minor Test) (d%)
3 -2 40 35
4 -1 45 40
5 -1 50 45
6 -1 55 50
7 0 60 55
8 0 65 60
9 0 70 65
10 0 75 70
11 0 80 75
12 0 85 80
13 0 90 85
14 0 92 88
15 +1 94 91
16 +2 96 95
17 +2 (+3 for fighters, paladins, and rangers) 98 97
18 +2 (+4 for fighters, paladins, and rangers) 100 99
19 +2 (+5 for fighters, paladins, and rangers) 100 99

Intelligence

Intelligence (“Int”) is a measure of a character's raw mental power—his or her ability to calculate, recall facts, and solve abstract problems. It is the most important attribute for magic users and illusionists. Intelligence also determines how many additional languages the character may learn beyond those he or she knows at the start of play.

Characters with intelligence higher than 18 are not affected by certain spells of the illusion type (whether cast by a magic user, cleric, illusionist, etc.). A character with intelligence 19 is immune to the effects of first level illusion spells. If a character were somehow to attain the godly intelligence of 20, he or she would also be immune to second level illusion spells, and so on.

Intelligence ability Scores

Intelligence Score Maximum Additional Languages
3 0
4 0
5 0
6 0
7 0
8 1
9 1
10 2
11 2
12 3
13 3
14 4
15 4
16 5
17 6
18 7
19 8

Wisdom

A character's wisdom score (“Wis”) indicates how “in tune” the character is with his or her surroundings. This translates not only to general awareness, but also to mystical attunement and the ability to understand peoples' motives. It is, in many ways, a measure of the “sixth sense.” Wisdom is the most important attribute for clerics and druids.

Wisdom Ability Scores

Wisdom Score Mental Saving Throw Bonus
3 -3
4 -2
5 -1
6 -1
7 -1
8 0
9 0
10 0
11 0
12 0
13 0
14 0
15 +1
16 +2
17 +3
18 +4
19 +5

Charisma

Charisma (“Cha”) determines the character's maximum number of henchmen (see Chapter 3), the henchmen's loyalty (which is also applied as a modifier to the henchmen's morale scores, see “Morale” in Chapter 3) and a Reaction Bonus. The Reaction Bonus should be added to the d% roll which indicates how an NPC or creature reacts to negotiation approaches; scores under 30% will generally indicate hostility or attacks, while higher scores may indicate a willingness to negotiate or even make friends. Note that a character is not always permitted a Reaction roll, since some creatures will be hostile irrespective of the character's charisma, and of course any negotiation approaches must be made in a language that the creature understands.

Charisma does not determine the outcome of negotiations, although it will affect them. The GM may well wish to roleplay through the encounter and determine the creature or NPC's reactions based on what the player says rather than the scores on the character sheet.

For players who understand the importance of henchmen and use them intelligently, charisma is the most important attribute in OSRIC.

Charisma Ability Scores

Charisma Score Maximum Henchmen Loyalty Bonus (d%) Reaction Bonus (d%)
3 1 -30 -25
4 1 -25 -20
5 2 -20 -15
6 2 -15 -10
7 3 -10 -5
8 3 -5 0
9 4 0 0
10 4 0 0
11 4 0 0
12 5 0 0
13 5 0 +5
14 6 +5 +10
15 7 +15 +15
16 8 +20 +25
17 10 +30 +30
18 15 +40 +35
19 20 +50 +40

Character Races

A character's race is a matter for the creating player's choice, from all the races for which the character qualifies by virtue of his or her ability scores. It is possible for a player voluntarily to lower an ability score in order to qualify for a desired race, but not to raise it for the same reason unless the GM grants special permission.

A note on starting ages and aging: It is a matter for the GM's discretion whether to adjust a character's ability scores based on the character's age. Some GMs add to constitution, and sometimes strength, and subtract from wisdom for younger characters, and make the converse change for older ones.

A note on racial languages: Demi-humans usually begin with several “free” languages. None may learn more than two additional languages over and above these, however, irrespective of their intelligence, save elves, who may learn three languages if their intelligence is 18.

Dwarfs

Dwarfs are a short and burly race, living in mountain fastnesses underground. They are loyal friends and fierce adversaries, known for their steadfastness in all things.

The dwarfs are inherently resistant to many spells and spell-like effects. Dwarfish characters gain bonuses against the use of most magic, including all spells, wands, rods, and staves. The amount of the bonus depends upon the dwarf's constitution: every 3.5 points of constitution (rounding down fractions) grants a bonus of +1 against such magic. Moreover, the hardy dwarfish nature imparts a similar bonus on any saving throws against poison.

Dwarfs are not a numerous folk, but they are adventurous, loving the lustre of gold, the glitter of gems, and the quality of wrought metals. Dwarfs can live to an age of 350 years or more.

Summary of Dwarfish Racial Abilities

  • +1 constitution, -1 charisma (with respect to all but dwarfs)
  • +1 “to hit” against goblins, half-orcs, hobgoblins, and orcs
  • +1 bonus per 3.5 points of Con to saves against magic
  • -4 penalty to any attacks made against the dwarf by giants, ogres, ogre mages, titans and trolls

Languages: Dwarfish, gnomish, goblin, kobold, and orcish, and the common tongue and the appropriate alignment tongue. Regardless of intelligence, a dwarf may only ever learn two languages in addition to those listed.

Infravision: 60-ft1)

Within 10-ft, a dwarf can detect certain facts concerning engineering, stonework, etc. Although no significant time is required, the character must deliberately observe his or her surroundings (i.e., the player must state that the dwarf is using this particular talent in order to gain information).

  • Detect the existence of slopes or grades: 75%
  • Detect the existence of new construction: 75%
  • Detect sliding or shifting rooms or walls: 66%
  • Detect traps involving stonework: 50%
  • Determine depth underground: 50%

Multi-class restrictions: The more restrictive of any two class requirements apply to multi-classed Dwarfish characters for the use of class abilities.

Permitted class options: Assassin, Cleric, Fighter, Thief, Fighter/Thief

Movement Rate: 90-ft

Starting Age:2)

  • Cleric 250+2d20
  • Fighter 40+5d4
  • Thief 75+3d6

Racial Limitations

Minimum/Maximum ability scores (after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of dwarf is not a valid choice for the character:

  • Strength 8/18
  • Dexterity 3/17
  • Constitution 12/19
  • Intelligence 3/18
  • Wisdom 3/18
  • Charisma 3/16

Level Limitations

  • Assassin 9
  • Cleric 8
  • Druid N/A
  • Fighter 9 (Str 18), 8 (Str 17), 7 (Str 16 or less)
  • Illusionist N/A
  • Magic User N/A
  • Paladin N/A
  • Ranger N/A
  • Thief Unlimited

Elves

Elves are thinner and generally smaller in stature than humans. The elves have a powerful bond with nature and do not have souls; their thinking and motives are quite alien to those of humankind, and in any dealings with elves, it is perilous to forget this.

Some elven clans have built elaborate civilisations, remote and beautiful places of profound learning, master craftsmanship, and long history. Such elves tend to be chaotic good in alignment and friendly, if aloof, from humans. More numerous are the wilder elves, predominantly chaotic neutral in alignment and often not friendly to other races, inclining even toward hostility.

Intruding into the territory of such elves is inadvisable, for their sense of humour with regard to humans is, at best, arbitrary and, at worst, cruel. Different as they are, these varied elven cultures all share the same racial abilities, unless the GM chooses otherwise. Elves can live to an age of 1,000 years or more.

Summary of Elven Racial Abilities

  • +1 dexterity, -1 constitution
  • 90% resistance to sleep and charm spells
  • Any pulled bow: +1 “to hit”
  • Longsword and short sword: +1 “to hit”

Languages: Common, elven, gnoll, gnomish, goblin, halfling, hobgoblin, orcish. Languages in addition to these are only possible if the character has an intelligence of 16+, with one additional language possible for each point of intelligence over 15.

Infravision: 60-ft

Detect secret doors: 1 in 6 chance to notice secret doors when passing within 10-ft, 2 in 6 chance to discover secret doors when searching, and 3 in 6 chance to discover concealed doors when searching.

Surprise: 4 in 6 chance to surprise when travelling in non-metal armour and alone, or more than 90-ft in advance of others, or with a party entirely consisting of elves and/or halflings. If a door must be opened (or some similar task), the chance of surprise drops to 2 in 6.

Multi-class restrictions: The less restrictive of any two class requirements apply to multi-classed elven characters, except that thieving abilities can only be used while wearing armour permitted to thieves.

Permitted Class Options: Assassin, Cleric, Fighter, Magic user, Thief, Fighter/Magic user, Fighter/Thief, Magic user/Thief, Fighter/ Magic user/Thief.

Movement Rate: 120-ft

Starting Age:

  • Cleric: 500+10d10
  • Fighter: 130+5d6
  • Magic User: 150+5d6
  • Thief: 100+5d6

Racial Limitations

Minimum/Maximum ability scores (after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of Elf is not a valid choice for the character:

  • Strength 3/18
  • Dexterity 7/19
  • Constitution 8/17
  • Intelligence 8/18
  • Wisdom 3/18
  • Charisma 8/18

Level Limitations

  • Assassin 10
  • Cleric 7
  • Druid N/A
  • Fighter 7 (Str 18), 6 (Str 17), 5 (Str 16 and below)
  • Illusionist N/A
  • Magic User 11 (Int 18+), 10 (Int 17), 9 (Int 16 and below)
  • Paladin N/A
  • Ranger N/A
  • Thief Unlimited

Gnomes

Gnomes are small folk imbued with the wilding power of illusion and misdirection. They are inveterate burrowers, often seeking hilly lands where gems and precious metals may be found. On average, they are shorter and slimmer of build than dwarfs, with larger noses and longer beards.

Like dwarfs, who are perhaps related to gnomes from some time in the distant and mythical past, gnomes are quite resistant to magic and sensitive to the nuances of construction. Gnomes can live to an age of 650 years or more.

Summary of Gnomish Racial Abilities:

  • +1 bonus per 3.5 points of Con to saves against magic and poison
  • +1 “to hit” kobolds and goblins
  • -4 to attack rolls by bugbears, giants, gnolls, ogres, ogre mages, titans, and trolls.

Languages: Common, dwarfish, gnomish, goblin, halfling, kobold. Gnomes may communicate with any normal burrowing animal. They may not learn more than two additional languages to those listed, regardless of intelligence.

Infravision: 60-ft

Within 10-ft, a gnome can detect certain facts concerning engineering, stonework, etc. Although no significant time is required, the character must deliberately observe his or her surroundings (i.e., the player must state that the gnome is using this particular talent in order to gain information).

  • Detect the existence of slopes or grades: 80%
  • Detect the existence of unsafe wall, ceiling, floor: 70%
  • Determine depth underground: 60%
  • Determine direction of north underground: 50%

Multi-class restrictions: Multi-classed gnomish characters may wear only leather armour, no better.

Permitted Class Options: Assassin, Cleric, Fighter, Illusionist, Thief, Fighter/Illusionist, Fighter/Thief, Illusionist/Thief.

Movement Rate: 90-ft

Starting Age:

  • Cleric 300+3d12
  • Fighter 60+5d4
  • Magic User 100+2d12
  • Thief 80+5d4

Racial Limitations

Minimum/Maximum ability scores(after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of gnome is not a valid choice for the character:

  • Strength 6/18
  • Dexterity 3/18
  • Constitution 8/18
  • Intelligence 7/18
  • Wisdom 3/18
  • Charisma 3/18

Racial Limitations:

Minimum/Maximum ability scores(after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of half-elf is not a valid choice for the character:

Half Elves

It is possible for elves and humans to interbreed, although elven fastidiousness makes this a fairly uncommon occurrence. Half elves do not have a separate culture or civilisation of their own, usually assimilating into the elven or human society in which they were raised.

Summary of Half Elven racial abilities:

  • 30% resistance to sleep and charm spells

Secret doors: When searching, a half-elf character can detect secret doors on a 2 in 6 and concealed doors on a 3 in 6. When passing within 10-ft of a concealed door, a half-elf will notice it on a 1 in 6.

Languages: Common, elven, gnoll, gnome, goblin, halfling, hobgoblin, orcish.

Multi-class restrictions: The less restrictive of any class requirements apply to multi-classed half-elven characters, except that thieving abilities can only be used while wearing armour permitted to thieves.

Permitted Class Options: Assassin, Cleric, Fighter, Magic user, Ranger, Thief, Cleric/Fighter, Cleric/Ranger, Cleric/Magic user, Fighter/Magic user, Fighter/Thief, Magic user/Thief, Cleric/Fighter/ Magic user, or Fighter/Magic user/Thief.

Infravision: 60-ft

Movement Rate: 120-ft

Starting Age:

  • Cleric 40+2d4
  • Fighter 22+3d4
  • Magic User 30+2d8
  • Thief 22+3d8 18), 7 (Str 17 and below), 6 (Str 16 and below)
  • Illusionist N/A
  • Magic User 8 (Int 18+), 7 (Int 17), 6 (Int 16 and below)
  • Paladin N/A
  • Ranger 8 (Str 18), 7 (Str 17 and below), 6 (Str 16 and below)
  • Thief Unlimited

Halflings

Halflings are a small and unprepossessing race, often living near human settlements at an agreeable distance from the bustle and hurriedness characteristic of humans. Halfling society is comfortable and staid, rooted in polite, placid, fed life. Halfling adventurers are thought aberrant, even lunatic, but also dashing and heroic figures, a charming and amusing contradiction of logic.

Halflings value learning and craftsmanship, as long as nothing is taken to an embarrassing extreme. They are capable of moving very quietly and are excellent marksmen; given the right personality, halflings can become excellent thieves. Halflings live to be 150 or more years old.

Summary of Halfling racial abilities

  • -1 Str, +1 Dex
  • +1 bonus per 3.5 points of Con to saves against magic (both aimed magic items and spells) and poison.
  • +3 bonus to attacks with a bow or sling

Surprise: 4 in 6 chance to surprise when travelling in nonmetal armour and alone, or more than 90-ft in advance of others, or with a party entirely consisting of elves and/or halflings. If a door must be opened (or some similar task), the chance of surprise drops to 2 in 6.

Languages: Common, dwarfish, gnome, goblin, halfling and orcish. For every point of intelligence above 16, a halfling may learn an additional language, but may not more than two additional languages regardless of intelligence.

Multi-class restrictions: Use of thieving abilities is only possible when wearing armour permitted to thieves.

Permitted Class Options: Fighter, Druid, Thief, or Fighter/Thief.

Infravision: 60-ft

Movement Rate: 90-ft

Starting Age:

  • Fighter 20+3d4
  • Druid 40+3d4
  • Thief 40+2d4

Racial Limitations

Minimum/Maximum ability scores(after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of halfling is not a valid choice for the character:

  • Strength 6/17
  • Dexterity 8/19
  • Constitution 10/18
  • Intelligence 6/18
  • Wisdom 3/17
  • Charisma 3/18

Level Limitations

  • Assassin N/A
  • Cleric N/A
  • Druid 6
  • Fighter 4
  • Illusionist N/A
  • Magic User N/A
  • Paladin N/A
  • Ranger N/A
  • Thief Unlimited

Half Orcs

The progeny of human/orc breeding are normally indistinguishable from orcs. However, a few are sufficiently human to gain levels in a character class, although they are severely limited in classes that do not focus upon violence and death.

Orcish blood runs strong in these half-breeds, and most of them are shifty, morally questionable, and unsophisticated. They are typically ugly, carrying the mark of orcish ancestry, but the same ancestry makes them deadly adversaries when the chips are down and the swords are out. half-orcs can live to be 70 years old or older.

Summary of Half Orcish racial abilities

  • +1 Str and Con, -2 Cha

Languages: Common, orcish. A half orc may learn a maximum of two additional languages, regardless of intelligence.

Multi-class Restrictions: For armour, the more restrictive of any two class requirements apply to multi-classed half orc characters for the use of class abilities. For weapons, the less restrictive requirements apply.

Class Options: Assassin, Cleric, Fighter, Thief, Cleric/Fighter, Cleric/Thief, Cleric/Assassin, Fighter/Thief, Fighter/ Assassin.

Infravision: 60-ft

Movement Rate: 120-ft

Starting Age:

  • Cleric 20+1d4
  • Fighter 13+1d4
  • Thief 20+2d4

Racial Limitations

Minimum/Maximum ability scores(after adjustment for race): If the ability scores rolled do not fall within these limits, then the race of half-orc is not a valid choice for the character:

  • Strength 6/18
  • Dexterity 3/17
  • Constitution 13/19
  • Intelligence 3/17
  • Wisdom 3/14
  • Charisma 3/12

Level Limitations

  • Assassin 15
  • Cleric 4
  • Druid N/A
  • Fighter 10
  • Illusionist N/A
  • Magic User N/A
  • Paladin N/A
  • Ranger N/A
  • Thief 7 (Dex 17), 6 (Dex 16 and below)

Humans

Humans are the standard for the game, and as such, humans have no unusual abilities or limitations in game terms. Because of their potential for unlimited progression in all the character classes save assassin and druid, humans are a popular choice for most players. This is an intentional feature of the rules.

A common house rule in OSRIC-compatible games is the adjustment or removal of Demi-human level limits. This will unbalance the game in favour of Demi-humans unless humans are given some corresponding advantage. GMs considering such a house rule for their own OSRIC-compatible games are advised to ensure that in most campaigns, humans should still represent an attractive choice for their players.

Level Limitations

  • Assassin 15
  • Cleric Unlimited
  • Druid 14
  • Fighter Unlimited
  • Illusionist Unlimited
  • Magic User Unlimited
  • Paladin Unlimited
  • Ranger Unlimited
  • Thief Unlimited

Starting age:

  • Cleric 20+1d4
  • Fighter 15+1d4
  • Mage 24+2d8
  • Thief 20+1d4

Character Classes

A character's class is a matter for the creating player's choice, within the range of classes for which the character qualifies by virtue of his or her ability scores and race. Some classes—particularly those with very high ability score requirements, such as paladin—should be very rare within the campaign, and even if some exceptional player character qualifies for the class, non-player characters of that class will be very uncommon.

Non-player characters will, for the most part, lack any kind of class at all. Such individuals are called “0-level” and their abilities are subsumed into fighters, hence the “0-level” entries for fighters; all player character fighters should begin at level 1. In the author's campaign, perhaps one non-player character in a hundred has a class (rising to as many as one in fifty in borderlands, or even one in thirty in the wilderness).

Assassin

Assassins are stealthy killers, trained by their shadowy guilds in the arts of spying, disguise, poison, and murder. Although assassins of lower level are little more than trained thugs, the eminences of this reprehensible profession are so feared as to be spoken of only in whispers. High-level assassins are artists of murder, and their experience with hunting highly-placed targets, coupled with extensive education and training, often gives the sinister nobility of this class a silken, refined veneer over their true, murderous natures. This veneer, like many things pertaining to the assassins, is deceptive; survival in the higher echelons of an assassins' guild requires animal cunning and a complete absence of mercy. Assassin characters must begin with an evil alignment.

Virtually all cities (and many towns) will have a guild of assassins operating within the city walls and in the surrounding region, made up of 6-24 assassins of varying level. Player character assassins, if they are identified by the local guild, will be invited to join (such invitations ranging from polite to violent). Joining a guild places the assassin under the command of the local guildmaster, which may be inconvenient (and will require the assassin to pay a share of his take to the guild), but assassins' guilds take a very dim view of freelancers working in their territory. Freelance assassins—and their companions—do not ordinarily live to enjoy old age. There are, of course, benefits to joining such a guild; training costs may be reduced, and the guild may be a good source of information about potential missions or nearby enemies.

Assassins' guilds are controlled by a guildmaster of 14th level—an assassin of lower level might take control, but would be unable to inspire the fear necessary to keep rival guilds from forming. To gain 14th level, an assassin character must take control of an assassins' guild by killing (directly or indirectly) the existing guildmaster. Whenever the control of an assassins' guild changes hands, most of the assassins will abandon the guild and depart the area, normally leaving the guild reduced to a quarter of its original membership.

The grandmaster of assassins (a campaign may have one or more) is a figure of legend and fear. These dark eminences usually live far from the cities, in remote and guarded locations—their fame is such that those who need their services will seek them out. To advance to 15th level, an assassin must find and kill one of the existing grandmasters.

The Assassin Character

Minimum Scores:Str 12, Dex 12, Con 6, Int 11, Wis 6
Hit Die Type:d6 (max 15)
Alignment:Any evil
Experience bonus:None
Armour/Shield Permitted:Leather or studded leather only (shields allowed)
Weapons Permitted:Any
Weapon Proficiencies:3+1 every 4 levels
Penalty “to hit” for non-proficiency:-3
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Assassin Class Abilities

Assassination: If an assassin gains surprise (see “Combat”) he or she may elect to assassinate the victim. The assassin need not roll “to hit” for an assassination attempt, which is a special attack resulting in a chance to kill the victim instantly and ensure damage even if the victim is not successfully killed. The percentage chance to kill a victim is 50%, with a bonus of 5% per level of the assassin and a penalty of 5% for every two levels of the target (rounding down; in the case of monsters, substitute “hit dice” for “level”). These numbers are approximate, for the GM should modify the assassin's chances slightly upward or downward according to the circumstances—guarded or wary targets are less likely to be killed, and unwary victims are more likely to die. If the assassination attempt does not succeed, the attack still inflicts normal damage, together with any applicable bonuses. The assassin does not gain backstab multiple damage on a failed assassination attempt, even if the assassination attempt was made from behind.

Backstab: An assassin may backstab with any of the melee weapons permissible to the thief class. Backstabbing doubles the weapon's damage at levels 1-4, triple at levels 5-8, quadruple at level 9-12, and so on. Also, an assassin attacks from behind with a bonus “to hit” of +4 rather than the ordinary +2.

Disguise: Assassins are masters of disguise. Within reasonable limits, an assassin can make him- or herself appear slightly shorter or considerably taller, fatter or thinner, or of the opposite gender. An assassin can even disguise him- or herself as a member of another race (again, within reason). Any person observing the disguised assassin has a base 2% chance to see through the disguise, with one chance per day to do so. The base chance of seeing through a disguise increases another 2% if the assassin is posing as another class, race or gender (max 8% chance). The GM may assign additional penalties and bonuses to this check if the observer is unusually wise or intelligent (or particularly stupid), and common sense, of course, applies at all times.

Poison: Assassins are not inherently better at using poison than any other character class capable of using poison, but generally have more opportunities to gain knowledge of poisons and their effects.

Thief Abilities: The assassin has thief abilities as a thief two levels below the assassin's level. At first level, the assassin has the thieving abilities of a first level thief, but does not gain the abilities of a second level thief until reaching fourth level.

Advanced Abilities

Languages (9th): Ninth and higher-level assassins with Int 15+ may learn languages that it would be impossible for a non-assassin to learn. An assassin can learn an alignment tongue other than his or her own, druids' cant, and thieves' cant as additional languages, but can only learn a maximum of four such special languages, one for each point of intelligence above 14. Only one such language can be learned per level above eighth. Such languages are over and above any limits imposed by the assassin's race and intelligence.

Read Scrolls (12th): When an assassin reaches 12th level, he or she has received sufficient training to cast spells from an arcane scroll (magic user or illusionist).

Assassin Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d6) Notes
1 0 1
2 1,600 2
3 3,000 3
4 5,750 4 The assassin may recruit assassins as henchmen
5 12,250 5
6 24,750 6
7 50,000 7
8 99,000 8 The assassin may recruit thieves as henchmen
9 200,500 9 Master Assassin
10 300,000 10
11 400,000 11
12 600,000 12 The assassin may recruit henchmen of any class
13 750,000 13
14 1,000,000 14 Guildmaster
15* 1,500,000 15 Grandmaster Assassin

* Level 15 at 1,500,000 experience points is the ceiling for assassins. Any further experience points gained by a character of this level are simply lost.

Assassin Saving Throw Table

Level TYPE OF SAVING THROW
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-4 14 16 13 12 15
5-8 12 15 12 11 13
9-12 10 14 11 10 11
13-15 8 13 10 9 9

Assassin “to hit” Table

Level ROLL REQUIRED “to hit” ARMOUR CLASS
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1-4 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12
5-8 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
9-12 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
13-15 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5

Cleric

Clerics are moral and spiritual leaders, warriors of faith who preach the will of the gods, interpret omens and portents, and strike down the evil or unfaithful. Most clerics have a patron deity, but some are champions of a particular moral alignment, venerating all deities of that alignment in addition to a patron deity, and yet others are the servants of a particular pantheon of deities. In a world of swords and sorcery, force of arms often speaks louder than moral suasion, and clerics are trained to do battle against the enemies of their gods. Some clerics are fanatics, zealously seeking new converts or hunting heretics. Others seem almost burdened by an inconvenient or even oppressive relationship with the divine forces. Evil clerics—sinister villains who prey upon fear and jealousy—sow discord in the world and gather converts for their demonic masters.

Clerics play an important support role for an adventuring party. Most clerical spells are oriented toward healing, strengthening, and defending others. However, when the need arises the cleric is fully capable of taking a place in the line of battle and smiting down infidels and foes. Clerics employ their holy symbols rather than spell books as a focus for their meditation. Cleric spells are automatically acquired as the cleric gains levels and no check is necessary to ensure they are understood; thus clerics may normally memorise any spell appropriate to their level. However, in some circumstances the powers the cleric serves may intervene and grant different spells to those requested; it is suggested that this is only done in extreme cases (such as when the cleric has been guilty of an alignment transgression of some kind, for example; more serious transgressions may result in fewer spells being granted, or even none at all). Some GMs may permit clerics of specific deities to have slightly different abilities from those described here.

When a cleric attains ninth level, he or she has accumulated sufficient divine favour and mortal renown to found a temple/stronghold. Such places are normally carved from the wilderness, in the same manner as a fighter establishes a freehold. For a cleric to assume the leadership of an existing temple, the details are left to the discretion of the GM; a level somewhat higher than ninth might be required. Whether the cleric establishes a stronghold or a temple, followers and acolytes will flock to the cleric's banner.

The Cleric Character

Minimum Scores:Str 6, Dex 3, Con 6, Int 6, Wis 9, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d8 (max 9)
Alignment:Any
Experience bonus:Wisdom 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Any
Weapons Permitted:Blunt only—club, flail, hammer, mace, oil, staff; clerics may hurl hammers, clubs, or oil, but may not employ other missile weapons
Weapon Proficiencies:2+1 every 3 levels
Penalty “to hit” for non-proficiency:-3
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Cleric Class Abilities

Spell Casting: Clerics may memorise and cast clerical spells in accordance with the tables provided hereafter.

Turning Undead: Clerics can “turn” the undead, making them flee from the cleric's holiness (or, in the case of an evil cleric, bringing them to heel as servants and minions). Because paladins are also capable of turning undead (though not with the same power as a cleric), rules for turning the undead are found later in this book rather than repeating them in the descriptions of both the paladin and cleric classes.

Bonus spells: These are awarded to clerics with high wisdom. They are not cumulative and are awarded by level; hence “2/2/1/1” means the cleric is granted 2-1st level, 2-2nd level, 1-3rd level, and 1-4th level bonus spells.

Cleric Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d8) Notes Spells by Level
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0 1 1
2 1,550 2 2
3 2,900 3 2 1
4 6,000 4 3 2
5 13,250 5 3 3 1
6 27,000 6 3 3 2
7 55,000 7 3 3 2 1
8 110,000 8 3 3 3 2
9 220,000 9 High Priest(ess) 4 4 3 2 1
10 450,000 9+2* 4 4 3 3 2
11 675,000 9+4* 5 4 4 3 2 1
12 900,000 9+6* 6 5 5 3 2 2
13 1,125,000 9+8* 6 6 6 4 2 2
14 1,350,000 9+10* 6 6 6 5 3 2
15 1,575,000 9+12* 7 7 7 5 4 2
16 1,800,000 9+14* 7 7 7 6 5 3 1
17 2,025,000 9+16* 8 8 8 6 5 3 1
18 2,250,000 9+18* 8 8 8 7 6 4 1
19 2,475,000 9+20* 9 9 9 7 6 4 2
20 2,700,000 9+22* 9 9 9 8 7 5 2
21 2,925,000 9+24* 9 9 9 9 8 6 2
22 3,150,000 9+26* 9 9 9 9 9 6 3
23 3,375,000 9+28* 9 9 9 9 9 7 3
24 3,600,000 9+30* 9 9 9 9 9 8 3

* Constitution hp adjustments no longer apply after the ninth level of experience. Each level gained thereafter requires 225,000 experience points and grants +2 hit points.

Cleric Saving Throw Table

Level Type of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-3 14 16 10 13 15
4-6 13 15 9 12 14
7-9 11 13 7 10 12
10-12 10 12 6 9 11
13-15 9 11 5 8 10
16-18 8 10 4 7 9
19+ 6 8 2 5 7

Cleric “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1-3 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11
4-6 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
7-9 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
10-12 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
13-15 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3
16-18 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
19+ 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Druid

Druids worship the spiritual power of nature, maintain and protect holy places, perform festivals and ritual observances, and protect balance and harmony between civilisation and nature. Their magic is rooted in the mystical oneness of nature, and they have particular power over fire, stone, and weather, as well as over plant and animal life.

Some druids pay homage to particular nature gods (some of these quite savage), while others eschew all deities and commune directly with the spiritual power of nature.

Rather than using a holy symbol as clerics do, druids require mistletoe, holly, or (if neither can be found) oak leaves to cast their spells, and one of these is a required component for all druidic spells unless a druidic spell has no material component specified in the spell description.

The druid must harvest these materials by the light of a full moon, or the darkness of a new moon, in order for the component to work with full efficacy. If mistletoe or holly is not gathered by the druid's hand at the proper time, the druid's spells will have only half the normal effect. Oak leaves always produce spells of half power, and if they are not harvested properly, oak leaves will permit spells of only one-quarter power.

Player character druids must be neutral, although druids of differing alignments may be found as non-player characters in some GMs' campaigns.

Druids receive bonus spells for high wisdom, just as clerics do. See the table provided under “Cleric” for details.

There can only be a certain number of high-level druids in the world. The limits are: 12th level druid (High Druid)—no more than 3 in the world at any one time; 13th level druid (Archdruid)—no more than 2 in the world at any given time, 14th level druid (Supreme Druid)—no more than a single Supreme Druid can exist.

If a druid receives so many experience points that he or she is eligible to increase to these levels, but all the vacant slots are already filled, then he or she must create a vacancy. This is done by issuing a formal challenge to the druid in question, following which the two characters must compete in a contest of some kind—often, but not necessarily, a duel.

The loser of the contest goes down to the next lowest level (losing all experience down to the very minimum to qualify for the new level). This may, in turn, result in a further contest if the preceding level is also fully occupied.

The Druid Character

Minimum Scores:Str 6, Dex 6, Con 6, Int 6, Wis 12, Cha 15
Hit Die Type:d8 (max 14)
Alignment:Neutral only
Experience bonus:Wisdom and Charisma 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Leather only, wooden shields only
Weapons Permitted:Club, dagger, dart, hammer, oil, scimitar, sling, spear, staff
Weapon Proficiencies:2+1 every 3 levels
Penalty to hit for non-proficiency:-4
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Druid Class Abilities

Druids' Cant: All druids speak a secret language called the druids' cant. The druidic cant cannot be learned by non-druids (unless otherwise noted, such as in the case of higher-level assassins).

Saving Throw Bonus: All druids gain a saving throw bonus of +2 against fire and lightning attacks of all kinds.

Spell Casting: Druids may memorise and cast druidic spells in accordance with the tables provided below.

Advanced Abilities

Druid's Knowledge (3rd): At third level and higher, a druid can identify plant and animal types, and can determine when water is pure and safe to drink.

Wilderness Movement (3rd): At third level and higher, a druid can move through any natural undergrowth leaving no trace of his or her passage, and may do so with no reduction in his or her normal movement speed.

Immunity to Fey Charm (7th): At seventh level and higher, the druid becomes immune to charms and other such mental enchantments cast by fey creatures such as dryads, pixies, brownies, etc.

Shapeshift (7th): Druids of 7th level or higher may change their forms up to three times per day. The form assumed must be a natural animal, no smaller than a mouse, and no larger than double the druid's normal weight; in the process of shapeshifting, the druid recovers 1d6×10 percent of any hit points he or she might have sustained as damage.

Druid Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d8) Notes Spells by Level
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0 1 2
2 2,000 2 2 1
3 4,000 3 Druid's Knowledge; Wilderness Movement 3 2 1
4 8,000 4 4 2 2
5 12,000 5 4 3 2
6 20,000 6 4 3 2 1
7 35,000 7 Immunity to Fey Charm; Shapeshift 4 4 3 1
8 60,000 8 4 4 3 2
9 90,000 9 5 4 3 2 1
10 125,000 10 5 4 3 3 2
11 200,000 11 5 5 3 3 2 1
12 300,000 12 High Druid 5 5 4 4 3 2 1
13 750,000 13 Archdruid 6 5 5 5 4 3 2
14* 1,500,000 14 Supreme Druid 6 6 6 6 5 4 3

* 14th level (at 1,500,000 experience points) is the ceiling for druids. Any further experience points the druid receives will simply be lost.

Druid Saving Throw Table

Level Type of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-3 14 16 10 13 15
4-6 13 15 9 12 14
7-9 11 13 7 10 12
10-12 10 12 6 9 11
13-14 9 11 5 8 10

Druid “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armor Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1-3 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
4-6 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
7-9 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6
10-12 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4
13-14 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

Fighter

When the clash of steel rings out in dark forests or dimly lit dungeons beneath the earth, it is the fighter who bears the brunt of the combat. Fighters are trained in the use of weapons and armour, usually beginning their adventuring careers after a stint of training as a town guardsman, soldier, man at arms, bandit, pirate, or mercenary.

Fighters are the backbone of an adventuring party; without them to hold the line, the other members of the party will be overrun before they can bring their own skills to bear. Fighters are the most powerful characters in melee or missile combat, whether on offence or defence. Together with the ranger and paladin, they have the most hit points, and their ability to survive the most brutal battles is therefore unrivalled.

They also have the best chance “to hit” of all the classes, particularly at higher level. They may use any kind of armour, shield, or weapon. Most fighters look forward to the day when their reputations will bring them into the ranks of the lesser nobility, where fighting prowess and armed followers are more important than high-flown bloodlines. It is no small matter to carve a “freehold out of the wilderness, but to do so is to leave behind a legacy in a world where most fortune-seekers die an unsung death.

A fighter of 9th level or higher who has built a castle and cleared a wide area around it of monsters (at least a 20 mile radius), will attract a body of mercenaries to his or her service, provided that these are paid a fair wage. He or she will also be able to tax each freeholder, at up to the maximum rate of 1 gp per month per resident. Some players may choose to retire a character at this point, satisfied that the character has entered the historical records and legends of the campaign world. Others may choose to view the stronghold merely as the first step toward the pinnacles of mythic power. Such player-held castles and villages provide a higher-level party with a base for adventures, a stronghold against enemies, and possibly the introduction of feudal politics and war into their already-eventful lives.

The Fighter Character

Minimum Scores:Str 9, Dex 6, Con 7, Int 3, Wis 6, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d10 (max 9 hit dice)
Alignment:Any
Experience bonus:Strength 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Any
Weapons Permitted:Any
Weapon Proficiencies:4+1 every 2 levels
Penalty to hit for non-proficiency:-2
Weapon Specialisation:Optional

Fighter Class Abilities

Bonus Attacks: Fighters with melee weapons attack once per round at 1st to 6th levels (1/1 attacks); at 7th to 12th levels, they attack thrice every two rounds (3/2 attacks); and at 13th or higher levels they attack twice per round (2/1 attacks). A partial additional attack (e.g. 3/2 attacks) means that the extra attack is taken on odd-numbered rounds in the combat sequence, hence two attacks on the first round, one on the second, two on the third and one on the fourth, if applicable.

Fighting the Unskilled: When the fighter is attacking creatures with less than a full hit die (i.e. less than 1d8 hit points), the fighter receives one attack for each of his or her levels of experience, e.g. a 4th level fighter attacking goblins would receive 4 attacks per round.

NB: A fighter exercising multiple attacks departs from the normal initiative procedure. The fighter will automatically attack first in the round unless fighting an opponent with multiple attacks of its own (in which case initiative should be rolled as normal). The fighter's second attack in any given melee round will come last in the sequence.

Weapon Specialisation (optional): With the permission of the GM, weapon specialisation may be selected during character generation. If weapon specialisation is not selected during character generation, it remains forever unavailable to the character, barring some magical or divine intervention.

If weapon specialisation is in play, fighters may take a second proficiency in the same weapon as the first, granting them one extra attack every 2 rounds with the weapon (hence 3/2 attacks with a melee weapon at 1st level, 2/1 at 7th and 5/2 at 13th), +1 “to hit” and +2 damage owing to their skill. Specialisation costs one proficiency “slot” for melee weapons and crossbows, and two “slots” for missile weapons other than crossbows.

Double Specialisation (optional): For melee weapons that are not pole-arms or two-handed swords, a third weapon proficiency may be used to specialise further; this increases combat bonuses to +3 “to hit” and +3 damage with the weapon.

Fighter Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d10) Notes
1 0 1
2 1,900 2
3 4,250 3
4 7,750 4
5 16,000 5
6 35,000 6
7 75,000 7 Bonus attacks
8 125,000 8
9 250,000 9 Lord (Lady)
10 500,000 9+3*
11 750,000 9+6

* Constitution-based hp adjustments no longer apply Each level gained thereafter requires 250,000 additional experience points and gains 3hp.

Fighter Saving Throw Table

Level Type of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
0 18 20 16 17 19
1-2 16 17 14 15 17
3-4 15 16 13 14 16
5-6 13 13 11 12 14
7-8 12 12 10 11 13
9-10 10 9 8 9 11
11-12 9 8 7 8 10
13-14 7 5 5 6 8
15-16 6 4 4 5 7
17-18 5 4 3 4 6
19+ 4 3 2 3 5

Fighter “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
0 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11
1 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
2 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
3 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
4 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
5 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6
6 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
7 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4
8 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3
9 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
10 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
11 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
12 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1
13 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2
14 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3
15 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5
17 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6
18 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7
19 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8
20+ 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9

Optional Rule: Where a fighter of extremely high level or with many bonuses “to hit” actually requires a negative score to hit his or her target, then at the GM's option, the negative score may be converted to a positive and applied as additional damage to the automatic hit. Thus, for example, a 20th level fighter with 19 strength and a +5 sword attacking an AC 2 dragon would require a roll of -8 “to hit” it; the character would be allowed to modify his or her damage roll by +8.

Illusionist

Illusionists are practitioners of phantasmal magic, a type of spell casting that influences the minds and senses of other beings, and at higher levels becomes intertwined with the shadow-realities beyond the Prime Material Plane. They are often classed with magic users, since phantasmal magic operates in the same manner as arcane spells—indeed, some sages state that it represents a different means of tapping into the same source. Illusionists are dependent upon their spell books, and can only normally cast spells they have learned from these books (exception: spells may be cast from illusionist scrolls). Acquisition of new spells is difficult and demanding, and must normally be accomplished through adventuring, although illusionists will automatically receive one new spell of the highest spell level that he or she may cast upon completing training after acquiring a new level of experience. They are limited by their intelligence in what spells they can learn according to the same table as provided under magic users.

At 10th level, an illusionist may establish a stronghold, usually a tower or small keep, as a fighter does.

The Illusionist Character

Minimum Scores:Str 6, Dex 16, Int 15, Wis 6, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d4 (max 10)
Alignment:Any
Experience bonus:None
Armour/Shield Permitted:None
Weapons Permitted:Dagger, dart, oil, staff
Weapon Proficiencies:1+1 per 5 levels
Penalty to hit for non-proficiency:-5
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Illusionist Class Abilities

Spell casting: Illusionists may memorise and cast phantasmal spells in accordance with the tables provided below. A beginning illusionist character will know four spells. Two spells should be chosen by the player from the list of first level spells, and the other two should be determined randomly from the list of first level spells. Illusionist spells are written in phantasmal script, which can ordinarily only be deciphered by an illusionist. Illusionists do not employ (or require) the read magic spell.

Illusionist Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d4) Notes Spells By Level
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0 1 1
2 2,500 2 2
3 4,750 3 2 1
4 9,000 4 3 2
5 18,000 5 4 3 1
6 35,000 6 4 3 2
7 60,250 7 May hire followers 4 3 2 1
8 95,000 8 4 3 2 2
9 144,500 9 5 3 3 2
10 220,000 10 Master of Phantasms 5 4 3 2 1
11 440,000 10+1* 5 4 3 3 2
12 660,000 10+2* 5 5 4 3 2 1
13 880,000 10+3* 5 5 4 3 2 2
14 1,100,000 10+4* 5 5 4 3 2 2 1
15 1,320,000 10+5* 5 5 4 4 2 2 2
16 1,540,000 10+6* 5 5 5 4 3 2 2
17 1,760,000 10+7* 6 5 5 4 3 3 2
18 1,980,000 10+8* 6 6 5 4 4 3 2
19 2,200,000 10+9* 6 6 5 5 5 3 2
20 2,420,000 10+10* 6 6 6 5 5 4 2
21 2,640,000 10+11* 6 6 6 6 5 4 3
22 2,860,000 10+12* 6 6 6 6 5 5 3
23 3,080,000 10+13* 6 6 6 6 6 5 4
24 3,300,000 10+14* 6 6 6 6 6 6 5

* Constitution-based hp adjustments no longer apply. Each level gained thereafter requires 220,000 experience points and grants +1 hit point.

Illusionist Saving Throw Table

Level Type Of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-5 11 15 14 13 12
6-10 9 13 13 11 10
11-15 7 11 11 9 8
16-20 5 9 10 7 6
21+ 3 7 8 5 4

Illusionist “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1-5 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11
6-10 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
11-15 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
16-20 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
21+ 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3

Magic User

Magic users are a rare breed—practitioners of the mysterious art of arcane spell casting. A lengthy apprenticeship of study and practice allows these somewhat eerie individuals to store arcane energy within their minds and to release it in the form of spells. Magic users cast spells by speaking a few magic words, weaving complex gestures in the air, and employing rare and magical materials. While magic users (with illusionists) are the weakest character class in combat, this weakness is balanced by possessing the most powerful and versatile spells in the game.

The full underlying principles of magic are beyond mortal comprehension; even wizards of the profoundest intellect struggle from momentary inklings to understand its more complex patterns. Nevertheless, those character who possess formidable intelligence and a certain intuitive gift, who are willing to devote themselves to a lifetime of study, may in time sufficiently master the art to be capable of shifting mountains and shattering entire armies. High-level magic users are the most feared and dangerous characters in the game.

Magic users do not gain bonus spells for high intelligence scores; intelligence does determine which spells they can understand and how many spells they may learn for each spell level.

Magic users are dependent upon their spell books, and normally may only cast spell they have learned from these books (exception: magic users may cast spells from arcane magical scrolls). Mages may not cast spells from divine, druidic or phantasmal magic scrolls. The acquisition of a new spell is difficult and demanding and must normally be accomplished through adventuring, although the mage will automatically receive one new spell of the highest spell level that he or she may cast upon acquiring a new level of experience.

OSRIC magic users are superficially similar to the wizards of fantasy literature such as Gandalf and Merlin, but they are more closely similar to mages described in the works of Jack Vance. His “Dying Earth” cycle, and particularly “Rhialto the Marvellous”, are highly recommended.

Magic users are the only class capable of fabricating magic items that they cannot themselves employ. Clerics, druids and illusionists can fabricate magic items, but only those they themselves can use; items such as magical swords, that no primary spell casting class may use, are in their creation the sole province of magic users.

At 11th level, a magic user may establish a stronghold (usually a tower or small keep) in the same manner as a fighter.

The Magic User Character

Minimum Scores:Str 3, Dex 6, Int 9, Wis 6, Con 6, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d4 (max 11)
Alignment:Any
Experience bonus:Int 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:None
Weapons Permitted:Dagger, dart, oil, staff
Weapon Proficiencies:1+1 per 5 levels
Penalty “to hit” for non-proficiency:-5
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Magic User Class Abilities

Spell casting: Magic users may memorise and cast arcane spells in accordance with the tables provided below. A beginning magic user character will know four spells. One of these will automatically be read magic. The second spell should be chosen by the player from the list of first level spells, and the last two should be determined randomly from the list of first level spells.

Advanced Abilities

Eldritch Craft (7th): Mages of 7th or higher level may create magical potions, scribe arcane scrolls (of spells that he or she already knows) and recharge magical rods, staves and wands. This process should be overseen by the GM, who must take care to ensure that it is not too easy! A long list of ingredients will always be required, some of which should be expensive, and others of which should be a challenge to acquire.

Eldritch Power (12th): Magic users of 12th level or higher may attempt to create other magical items by means of the enchant an item spell. However, this is even more difficult than creating a potion or scroll, and the various components required should be of a rarity and value appropriate to the magic item under consideration. Even then, success will not be guaranteed.

Magic User Spell Acquisition Table

Intelligence Score Chance to Understand Spells (d%) Minimum/Maximum Spells Understood Per Level
9 35 4/6
10-12 45 5/7
13-14 55 6/9
15-16 65 7/11
17 75 8/14
18 85 9/18
19 90 10/22

Magic User Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d4) Notes Spells By Level
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 0 1 1
2 2,400 2 2
3 4,800 3 2 1
4 10,250 4 3 2
5 22,000 5 4 2 1
6 40,000 6 4 3 2
7 60,000 7 Eldritch Craft 4 3 2 1
8 80,000 8 4 3 3 2
9 140,000 9 4 4 3 2 1
10 250,000 10 4 4 3 2 2
11 375,000 11 Wizard 4 4 4 3 3
12 750,000 11+1* Eldritch Power 5 4 4 3 3 1
13 1,125,000 11+2* 5 5 4 3 3 2
14 1,500,000 11+3* 5 5 5 4 4 2 1
15 1,875,000 11+4* 5 5 5 4 4 3 2
16 2,250,000 11+5* Mage 5 5 5 4 4 3 2 1
17 2,625,000 11+6* 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 2
18 3,000,000 11+7* Archmage 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 2 1
19 3,375,000 11+8* 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 1
20 3,750,000 11+9* 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 2
21 4,125,000 11+10* 6 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 2
22 4,500,000 11+11* 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 4 2
23 4,875,000 11+12* 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 3
24 5,250,000 11+13* 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 3

* Constitution-based hp adjustments no longer apply. Each level gained thereafter requires 375,000 experience points and grants +1 hit point.

Magic User Saving Throw Table

Level Type Of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-5 11 15 14 13 12
6-10 9 13 13 11 10
11-15 7 11 11 9 8
16-20 5 9 10 7 6
21+ 3 7 8 5 4

Magic User “to hit” Table

Level Roll required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1-5 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11
6-10 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
11-15 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
16-20 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
21+ 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3

Paladin

A paladin is a paragon of righteousness sworn to be, and always to remain, Lawful Good. If this vow is ever breached, the paladin must atone and perform penance to be decided by a powerful NPC cleric of the same alignment—unless the breach was intentional, in which case the paladin instantly loses his or her enhanced status as a paladin and may never regain it. Such a “fallen paladin” is in all respects a fighter, with no special powers, for the remainder of his or her career.

The Paladin class in OSRIC superficially resembles such legendary warriors as Sir Galahad or Sir Gawaine of the Arthurian cycle, but is more closely similar to characters described in the works of Poul Anderson. His “Three Hearts and Three Lions” is particularly highly recommended.

Paladins suffer the following restrictions:

First, the paladin may never possess more than ten magic items, and no more than a single suit of magic armour with no more than one magic shield may be so owned.

Second, the paladin must always give away a tenth of any money which he or she receives to some Lawful Good cause, and if he or she has any money remaining after paying his or her costs (such as maintaining equipment and paying servants' wages) this surplus must be likewise donated.

Third, paladins will not associate with characters who are not Good in alignment save under very exceptional circumstances (i.e., if approved by the GM).

The Paladin Character

Minimum Scores:Str 12, Dex 6, Con 9, Int 9, Wis 13, Cha 17
Hit Die Type:d10 (max 9)
Alignment:Lawful Good only
Experience bonus:Str and Wis 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Any
Weapons Permitted:Any
Weapon Proficiencies:3+1 every 2
Penalty to hit for non-proficiency:-2
Weapon Specialisation:Optional rule—as fighter

Paladin Class Abilities

Improved Saving Throws: The paladin uses a more favourable saving throw table than other classes (see table, below).

Cure Disease: Paladins can cure disease (as the clerical spell) by touch, once per week. Paladins of higher than 5th level may do so twice per week, and those higher than 10th level thrice per week. Paladins themselves are completely immune to disease.

Detect Evil: A paladin may detect evil at any range up to 60-ft at will, provided he or she concentrates on doing so.

Protection from Evil: A paladin radiates an aura within a 10-ft radius, equivalent to the clerical spell protection from evil.

Lay on Hands: Once per day, the paladin may heal 2 hit points/level to any creature touched (e.g. a third level paladin would heal 6hp with this ability).

Turn Undead (3rd): Paladins of third level and higher gain the ability to turn undead as a good aligned cleric does, but as a cleric of two levels lower than the paladin's level.

Summon Warhorse (4th): At fourth level, the paladin may summon a special Paladin's Warhorse, a heavy warhorse with enhanced hit points, intelligence and movement speed. Such a destrier may be called only once every ten years.

Bonus Attacks (8th): Paladins gain additional attacks as fighters do, but less swiftly. A paladin has one attack at 1st to 7th level, 3/2 attacks at 8th to 14th level, and two attacks at 15th level and above. If the optional weapon specialisation rules are permitted by the GM, paladins may specialise as fighters do, save that they receive fewer proficiencies and gain extra attacks more slowly as described above.

Clerical Spell casting (9th): Paladins gain the ability to cast certain cleric spells at 9th level (see table, below).

Paladin Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d10) Notes Spell Casting Level Spells By Level
1 2 3 4
1 0 1 0
2 2,550 2 0
3 5,500 3 Turn Undead 0
4 12,500 4 Warhorse 0
5 25,000 5 0
6 45,000 6 0
7 95,000 7 0
8 175,000 8 Bonus Attacks 0
9 325,000 9 Knight 1 1
10 600,000 9+3* 2 2
11 1,000,000 9+6* 3 2 1
12 1,350,000 9+9* 4 2 2
13 1,700,000 9+12* 5 2 2 1
14 2,050,000 9+15* 6 3 2 1
15 2,400,000 9+18* 7 3 2 1 1
16 2,750,000 9+21* 8† 3 3 1 1
17 3,100,000 9+24* 8† 3 3 2 1
18 3,450,000 9+27* 8† 3 3 3 1
19 3,800,000 9+30* 8† 3 3 3 2
20 4,150,000 9+33* 8† 3 3 3 3
21 4,500,000 9+36* 8† 4 3 3 3
22 4,850,000 9+39* 8† 4 4 3 3
23 5,200,000 9+42* 8† 4 4 4 3
24 5,550,000 9+45* 8† 4 4 4 4

* Constitution-based hp adjustments no longer apply

† 8th is the ceiling spell casting level for paladins; they may never cast spells as a High Priest or Priestess does. Each level gained thereafter requires 350,000 additional experience points and gains 3hp.

NB: Paladins do not gain bonus cleric spells for having high wisdom. This ability is limited to “true” priests, i.e. clerics or druids.

Paladin Saving Throw Table

Level Type Of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-2 14 15 12 13 15
3-4 13 14 11 12 14
5-6 11 11 9 10 12
7-8 10 10 8 9 11
9-10 8 7 6 7 9
11-12 7 6 5 6 8
13-14 5 3 3 4 6
15-16 4 2 2 3 5
17-18 3 2 2 2 4
19+ 2 2 2 2 3

Paladin “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
2 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
3 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
4 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
5 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6
6 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
7 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4
8 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3
9 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
10 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
11 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
12 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1
13 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2
14 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3
15 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5
17 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6
18 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7
19 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8
20+ 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9

Ranger

Rangers are a special variation of the fighter class. They are modelled on such characters of fiction as Aragorn and Robin Hood and are particularly expert in wilderness situations. Rangers are defenders of the poor and serve to protect civilisation from the evil forces that lurk beyond civilised lands.

Rangers must abide by certain limitations, in the same fashion as paladins:

First, the ranger must always remain of good alignment (lawful, neutral or chaotic). Any deliberate change in the ranger's alignment away from good will result in the character becoming a mere fighter, with 8-sided hit dice, never able to regain ranger-hood. An unintentional change will transform the character into a fighter as above, but in this case, with sufficient questing and atonement, the ranger may be permitted to recover his or her status. The GM will determine the precise details of this process according to the situation.

Second, rangers may not employ mercenaries or servants until they reach 8th level or higher. Even once permitted, a ranger may not employ any mercenary or servant who he or she suspects (or ought to suspect) is not of good alignment.

Third, a maximum of three rangers may travel or operate together at any one time.

Fourth, rangers travel light and may not keep any more treasure than they can lift (including any amount the ranger can carry on his or her steed, if any).

The Ranger Character

Minimum Scores:Str 13, Dex 6, Con 14, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d8 (max 11 at 10th level)
Initial Hit Die:2*
Alignment:Any good
Experience bonus:Str, Int, and Wis 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Any
Weapons Permitted:Any
Weapon Proficiencies:3+1 every 2
Penalty “to hit” for non-proficiency:-2
Weapon Specialisation:Optional rule—as fighter

* Rangers are different from fighters and paladins in terms of hit points. Rangers roll 8-sided dice to determine their hp, but they receive two such dice at first level. They gain 1d8 per level thereafter until they achieve a ceiling of 11 hit dice (at 10th level).

Ranger Class Abilities

Alert Against Surprise: Rangers are less likely to be surprised (only on a 1 on 1d6), and more likely to surprise others (1-3 on 1d6) than other character classes.

Damage Bonus vs Humanoids: Rangers receive a bonus of +1 damage per ranger level against evil humanoid or giantish opponents (including such creatures as orcs, goblins, and giants, for example). Thus, a 3rd level ranger would receive +3 damage per hit against these creatures. This damage bonus applies only in hand-to-hand “melee” combat.

Tracking: Rangers may track other creatures, with a base 90% chance of success in rural settings (modified by the GM according to such factors as the age of the trail, the prevailing terrain and current weather conditions) and a base 65% chance in urban or dungeon settings (again, modified by the GM to take account of local conditions).

Advanced Abilities

Bonus Attacks (8th): Rangers gain additional attacks as fighters do, but less swiftly. A ranger has one attack at 1st to 7th level, 3/2 attacks at 8th to 14th level, and two attacks at 15th and above. If the optional weapon specialisation rules are permitted by the GM, rangers may specialise as fighters do, save that they receive fewer proficiencies and gain extra attacks more slowly as described above.

Spell Casting (8th): At eighth level, rangers receive limited spell powers, drawn from the Druid and Magic user spell lists according to the table given hereafter.

Band of Followers (10th): Rangers of 8th level or higher receive a special body of followers. The GM will determine the exact nature of a ranger's special followers, but the group may include unusual and magical creatures; centaurs and werebears, for example, would be possible followers.

Scrying Device Use(10th): Rangers of 10th level or higher may use crystal balls and other such devices that permit magical scrying.

Ranger Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d8) Notes Spell Casting Level Druid Spells Mage Spells
1 2 3 1 2
1 0 2 0
2 2,250 3 0
3 4,500 4 0
4 9,500 5 0
5 20,000 6 0
6 40,000 7 0
7 90,000 8 May employ followers 0
8 150,000 9 Bonus attacks 1 1
9 225,000 10 1 1 1
10 325,000 11 Ranger Lord (Lady) 2 2 1
11 650,000 11+2* 2 2 2
12 975,000 11+4* 3 2 1 2
13 1,300,000 11+6* 3 2 1 2 1
14 1,625,000 11+8* 4 2 2 2 1
15 1,950,000 11+10* Bonus attacks 4 2 2 2 2
16 2,275,000 11+12* 5 2 2 1 2 2
17 2,600,000 11+14* 5 2 2 2 2 2
18 2,925,000 11+16* 6† 3 2 2 2 2
19 3,250,000 11+18* 6† 3 2 2 3 2
20 3,575,000 11+20* 6† 3 3 2 3 2
21 3,900,000 11+22* 6† 3 3 2 3 3
22 4,225,000 11+24* 6† 3 3 3 3 3
23 4,550,000 11+26* 6† 4 3 3 3 3
24 4,875,000 11+28* 6† 4 3 3 4 3

* Constitution-based hp adjustments no longer apply

† 6th is the ceiling spell casting level for rangers. Each level gained thereafter requires 325,000 additional experience points and gains 2hp.

NB: Rangers do not gain bonus druid spells for having high wisdom. This ability is limited to “true” priests, i.e. clerics or druids.

Ranger Saving Throw Table

Level Type Of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-2 16 17 14 15 17
3-4 15 16 13 14 16
5-6 13 13 11 12 14
7-8 12 12 10 11 13
9-10 10 9 8 9 11
11-12 9 8 7 8 10
13-14 7 5 5 6 8
15-16 6 4 4 5 7
17-18 5 4 3 4 6
19+ 4 3 2 3 5

Ranger “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
2 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
3 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
4 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
5 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6
6 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5
7 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4
8 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3
9 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
10 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
11 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
12 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1
13 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2
14 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3
15 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5
17 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6
18 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7
19 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8
20+ 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9

Thief

Thieves sneak furtively in the shadowed alleyways of cities, living by their wits. They are often members of the criminal underclass, usually trained by a thieves' guild in the arts of burglary and stealth. It is not uncommon for a thief to seek out the great rewards that can be gained from the adventuring life, especially when circumstances require lying low for a while.

Most thieves come from the teeming masses of a large city, wherein a thieves' guild is often the only source of justice and exercises as much power as the city's legitimate government. Of course, not all thieves are members of a guild. Some are freelancers, evading both the authorities and the guild, living on the edge of the knife. Some are even found working on the side of the law; agents or spies who use their skills in more accepted (though equally shadowy) pursuits. A thief character must be of any neutral or evil alignment. Neutral good thieves are permitted because of the neutral component of their alignment.

Sensible adventuring parties will almost always include a thief, for the skills of such a character are invaluable in reaching inaccessible places via climb walls, pick locks, and so on. In addition, dungeons frequently contain traps which must be located and disarmed, and the thief's cunning and stealth conspire to make him or her very useful in a scouting role.

Thieves in OSRIC are modelled on characters of fiction and legend, particularly characters from the works of Fritz Leiber and Jack Vance. Leiber's “Lankhmar” series is highly recommended, particularly for its description of the operation of a typical thieves' guild; but the high-level thief's ability to read (or misread) magic scrolls is a nod to Vance's Cugel.

The Thief Character

Minimum Scores:Str 6, Dex 9, Con 6, Int 6, Cha 6
Hit Die Type:d6
Initial Hit Die:1
Alignment:Any neutral or any evil
Experience bonus:Dex 16+
Armour/Shield Permitted:Leather or studded leather only, no shields
Weapons Permitted:Club, dagger, dart, oil, sling, single-handed swords (except bastard swords)
Weapon Proficiencies:2+1 every 4 levels
Penalty to hit for non-proficiency:-3
Weapon Specialisation:N/A

Thief Class Abilities

Backstab: If the thief can approach his or her target unobserved and strike with a melee weapon, the attack is made at +4 to hit. Damage from a backstab is doubled or trebled if the thief is of 5th level or higher. Thieves of 9th level or higher do quadruple damage, while those of 13th or greater level quintuple the number shown on the die. Damage modifiers (such as those pertaining to strength or magic) are not multiplied from a backstab.

Climb: Climbing represents a thief's ability to scale sheer walls and surfaces, cling to ceilings, and perform other feats of climbing that would normally be impossible. Climbing checks must ordinarily be repeated for every ten ft of climbing. Non-thieves cannot climb walls, cliffs, or any vertical surface without the use of a rope or magic, making the presence of a thief vital to many adventuring parties.

Find Traps: This ability represents the thief's minute visual inspection of a new area for tiny telltale signs that something of interest or danger may be concealed nearby. It requires a full turn (10 minutes) to accomplish.

Hide in Shadows: Some shadow must be present for this ability to be used, but if the check is successful the thief is effectively invisible until he makes an attack or moves from the shadows. The ability can also be used to blend in with a crowd of people rather than disappear into shadows.

Move Quietly: Use of this skill allows the thief to move with preternatural silence even over surfaces such as squeaky floors.

Open Locks/Disarm Traps: Opening locks and disarming traps (without springing them) is a skill unique to thieves, which cannot be successfully attempted by members of other classes. A thief can also set traps (with the same chance as to disarm).

Pick Pockets: If the thief's pick pockets check fails by 20% or more, then his or her attempt has been discovered and the intended victim will almost always take hostile action.

Read Languages: The thief may attempt to read languages and ciphers of a non-magical nature only.

Thieves' Cant: Thieves have their own language.

Advanced Abilities

Read Scrolls (10th): When a thief reaches 10th level, he or she has become versed enough in training to cast spells from an arcane or phantasmal scroll (magic user or illusionist). However, this casting is not always successful. The thief should roll against his or her intelligence as a magic user or illusionist does, and if the score shown on the die is insufficient for the thief to cast the spell, then the casting will fail, possibly (at the GM's option) having some entirely unexpected effect.

Thief Level Advancement

Level Base Experience Points Required Hit Dice (d6) Notes
1 0 1
2 1,250 2
3 2,500 3
4 5,000 4
5 10,000 5
6 20,000 6
7 40,000 7
8 70,000 8
9 110,000 9
10 160,000 10 Master Thief; may read scrolls
11 220,000 10+2*
12 440,000 10+4*

* Con-based hp adjustments no longer apply Each level thereafter requires 220,000 experience points and grants +2 hit points.

Thief Skills Table—Base Chance

Level Climb Walls Find Traps Hear Noise Hide in Shadows Move Quietly Open Locks Pick Pockets Read Languages
1 80% 25% 10% 20% 20% 30% 35% 1%
2 82% 29% 13% 25% 25% 34% 39% 5%
3 84% 33% 16% 30% 30% 38% 43% 10%
4 86% 37% 19% 35% 35% 42% 47% 15%
5 88% 41% 22% 40% 40% 46% 51% 20%
6 90% 45% 25% 45% 45% 50% 55% 25%
7 91% 49% 28% 50% 50% 54% 59% 30%
8 92% 53% 31% 55% 55% 58% 63% 35%
9 93% 57% 34% 60% 60% 62% 67% 40%
10 94% 61% 37% 65% 65% 66% 71% 45%
11 95% 65% 40% 70% 70% 70% 75% 50%
12 96% 69% 43% 75% 75% 74% 79% 55%
13 97% 73% 46% 80% 80% 78% 83% 60%
14 98% 77% 49% 85% 85% 82% 87% 65%
15 99% 81% 52% 90% 90% 86% 90% 70%
16 99% 85% 55% 91% 91% 90% 91% 75%
17 99% 89% 58% 92% 92% 92% 92% 80%
18 99% 91% 61% 93% 93% 93% 93% 85%
19 99% 93% 64% 94% 94% 94% 94% 90%
20 99% 95% 67% 95% 95% 95% 95% 92%
21 99% 97% 70% 96% 96% 96% 96% 94%
22 99% 99% 73% 97% 97% 97% 97% 96%
23 99% 99% 76% 98% 98% 98% 98% 98%
24 99% 99% 79% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99%

Thief Skills Table—Dexterity Adjustments

Dexterity Climb Walls Find Traps Hear Noise Hide in Shadows Move Quietly Open Locks Pick Pockets Read Languages
9 -15% -10% -20% -10% -15%
10 -10% -5% -15% -5% -10%
11 -5% -10% -5%
12 -5%
13
14
15
16 +5%
17 +5% +5% +5% +10%
18 +10% +10% +10% +15% +5%
19 +15% +15% +15% +20% +15%

Thief Skills Table—Racial Adjustments

Race Climb Walls Find Traps Hear Noise Hide in Shadows Move Quietly Open Locks Pick Pockets Read Languages
Dwarf -10% +15% -5% +15% -5%
Elf -5% +5% +5% +10% +5% -5% +5% +10%
Gnome -15% +5% +10%
Half-elf +5% -— +10%
Halfling -15% +5% +15% +15% +5% -5%
Half-orc +5% +5% +5% +5% -5% -10%
Human +5% +5%

Note: Subject to the GM's discretion, no combination of adjustments can reduce a thief's chance of success in a thieving skill below 1% or increase it above 99%. In other words, there is always a small chance of success or risk of failure unless the GM decides the circumstances are exceptional.

Thief Saving Throw Table

Level Type of Saving Throw
Aimed Magic Items (e.g., rod, staff, wand) Breath Weapons Death, Paralysis, Poison Petrifaction, Polymorph Spells for unlisted categories
1-4 14 16 13 12 15
5-8 12 15 12 11 13
9-12 10 14 11 10 11
13-16 8 13 10 9 9
17-20 6 12 9 8 7
21+ 4 11 8 7 5

Thief “to hit” Table

Level Roll Required “to hit” Armour Class
-10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1-4 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11
5-8 24 23 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9
9-12 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6
13-16 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4
17-20 20 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
21+ 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Multi-Classing and Dual-Classing

Multi-classing, which is an option available only to non-human characters, is simultaneous advancement in two or more different classes. Dual-classing, an option available only to human characters, is the ability to switch classes and begin advancing exclusively in a new character class. Specific information about the interaction of the restrictions and abilities of a multi-classed character are described in the racial description of each race. Gnomish multi-classed characters are, for example, limited to leather armour in order to cast spells, while elven multi-classed characters are not. These restrictions reflect the particular nature of the non-human races and thus are detailed in the race descriptions. There is a general rule, however, that a cleric/fighter may use edged weapons. When a non-human character has more than one character class, any experience points gained by the character will be divided evenly between these two classes, even once the character can no longer progress in one of the classes.

Multi-class characters may choose which of their classes' tables they use for combat and saving throws. So for example, a cleric/fighter normally uses the fighter attack charts and the cleric saving throw matrices.

When the character advances in one of his or her classes, additional hit points are determined by rolling the appropriate die (d4 for magic users and illusionists, d6 for thieves and assassins, etc.), adding the appropriate constitution modifier, and dividing by the number of classes involved (so two for a cleric/thief, or three for a fighter/cleric/magic user, for example).

It is therefore entirely possible for a multi-class character to be at different levels of experience in different classes. As an extreme example, a half-orcish cleric/assassin of level 4/15 is possible.

Optional Rule: Some GMs limit elven and half-elven fighter/magic users and fighter/magic user/clerics in respect of the armour they may wear while casting spells. If this optional rule is in play, such a character may only cast arcane spells if unarmoured—unless they are wearing elfin chain. The character may still cast divine spells regardless of the armour he or she is wearing. (This rule assumes that elfin chain is specially designed to allow fighter/magic users to wear it.)

Dual-class characters are humans who elect to change irrevocably from one class to another. The character class of a non-human represents talents and abilities that are somewhat more innate than those of humankind. Humans are more flexible and can generally become more skilled in any one class than non-humans, but lacking the innate talents of the other races, they can only focus upon one class at a time.

In order to switch from one class to another, the human character must have an ability score of 15+ in the prime requisite(s) of the original class, and of 17+ in the prime requisite(s) of the new class. The character retains his or her hit points. He or she can use the particular abilities of the original class, but doing so will cause the character to forfeit all experience points from that adventure (as determined by the GM). This restriction applies until the character has advanced in the new class to a level at least one higher than was attained in the original class.

When the character begins the process of learning a new class, he or she gains the abilities of the new class as a first level member of that class, and all experience is applied to progressing in the new class. The character gains no additional hit points until reaching a level in the new class one higher than in the original class, after which time the character's hit points advance as per the new class.

Unlike multi-class characters, dual-classed characters cannot perform the functions of several different classes simultaneously. So, for example, an elven fighter/magic user could cast arcane spells while wearing armour, but a human dual-classed fighter and magic user would have to remove his or her armour to do the same thing.

However, with dual-classed characters, any combination of classes is possible, provided the character qualifies in terms of ability scores and can comply with any relevant alignment restrictions. Theoretically, an individual with very high ability scores could play a cleric/paladin or a magic user/illusionist.

Alignment

Alignment represents where a character falls in terms of the ever-present battle between good and evil. Along the law-chaos axis, it also represents how the character approaches such issues. Alignment is more than a philosophy; evil and good are palpably real in the game world. An evil person bears the poison of his or her alignment in his or her very soul, and magic spells can even be used to detect the stain of it. In general, the good alignments will work together, although there may well be misunderstandings and disputes between those of differing good alignments. Relationships between those of evil alignments will generally be based on power and fear, although many evil aligned individuals or monsters are natural followers, not seeking to usurp power as much as they will seek to ally themselves with and serve the most powerful. The moral dictates of alignment are not tied to culture in any way; they are objective reality. If a barbarian comes from a society that kills the weak, he or she is evil if he or she accedes to the practice, even though it is considered necessary or beneficial in that culture. Such a culture is evil.

Each alignment has an “alignment language” specific to that alignment, allowing characters of that alignment to communicate with one another to a certain degree. Alignment tongues are not precisely languages; they cannot be rendered into writing, but they can be an effective mode of communication nonetheless, consisting of a variety of words, gestures, and even facial expressions. Alignment tongues are almost never used unless the speaker is certain he or she will be heard only by members of the same alignment.

Note that not all creatures of a particular alignment will speak their alignment tongue, although Demi-humans and humanoids will normally do so. A creature such as a chimæra, for example, that is non-humanoid and generally evil by nature rather than by choice, might be chaotic evil in alignment but would not speak the chaotic evil alignment tongue. A gnoll, however, that is humanoid and evil by choice as well as by nature, will tend to speak the chaotic evil alignment tongue.

The Nine Alignments

Nine distinct alignments define all the possible combinations of the law-chaos axis with the good-evil axis. Remember that individuals vary from this norm, and that a given character may act more or less in accord with his or her alignment from day to day. Use these descriptions as guidelines, not as scripts.

Lawful Good, “Crusader”: A lawful good character acts as a good person is expected or required to act. He or she combines a commitment to oppose evil with the discipline to fight relentlessly. He or she normally tells the truth, keeps his or her word, helps those in need, and speaks out against injustice. A lawful good character hates to see the guilty go unpunished. Generally, lawful good characters seek to combine the values of both honour and compassion.

Neutral Good, “Benefactor”: A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He or she is devoted to helping others. He or she might work with or on behalf of kings and magistrates, but does not feel beholden to them if he or she feels that they are not serving the cause of good. Neutral good characters value doing what is good without a particular bias for or against order (or laws).

Chaotic Good, “Rebel”: A chaotic good character acts as his or her conscience directs, with little regard for what others might expect. He or she makes his or her own way, but is generally kind and benevolent. He or she believes in goodness and personal honour, but has little use for laws and regulations.

Such a character disdains those who seek to intimidate others and tell them what to do. He or she follows his or her own moral compass, which, although good, may not agree with that of society. Chaotic good characters value the combination of a good heart with a free spirit.

Lawful Neutral, “Judge”: A lawful neutral character acts as law, tradition, or a personal code directs him. Order and organisation are paramount. He or she may believe in personal order and live by a code or standard, or might believe in order for all, favouring a strong, organised government. Lawful neutral characters value reliability and honour, and some can be quite zealous about forcing these attributes onto society or other individuals.

Neutral: A neutral character has no allegiance to either good vs evil or law vs chaos. Most neutral characters exhibit a lack of conviction or bias rather than a commitment to neutrality. These normally think of good as preferable to evil—after all, they would rather have good neighbours and rulers than evil ones.

Still, such characters are not personally committed to upholding good in any abstract or universal way, especially when there is treasure to be had. Some neutral characters, on the other hand, are morally committed to neutrality. They see good, evil, law, and chaos as prejudices and dangerous extremes, advocating and supporting neutrality as the best, most balanced road in the long run.

Chaotic Neutral, “Free Spirit”: A chaotic neutral character follows his or her whims. He or she is an individualist first and last. He or she values his or her own liberty but does not strive to protect others' freedom. He or she avoids authority, resents restrictions, and challenges traditions.

A chaotic neutral character does not normally intentionally disrupt organisations as part of a campaign of anarchy. To do so, he or she would have to be motivated either by good (and a desire to liberate others) or evil (and a desire to make those different from him- or herself suffer). A chaotic neutral character may be unpredictable, but his or her behaviour is not normally totally random.

Lawful Evil, “Dominator”: A lawful evil villain methodically takes what he or she wants within the limits of his or her code of conduct without regard for whom it hurts. He or she cares about tradition, loyalty, and order but not about freedom, dignity, or life. He or she plays by the rules but without mercy or compassion. He or she is comfortable in a hierarchy and would like to rule, but is willing to serve. He or she condemns others not according to their actions but according to race, religion, homeland, or social rank. He or she is loath to break laws or promises.

This reluctance comes partly from his or her nature and partly because he or she depends on order to protect him- or herself from those who oppose him or her on moral grounds. Some lawful evil characters have particular taboos, such as not killing in cold blood (but having underlings do it) or not letting children come to harm (if it can be helped). They imagine that these compunctions put them above unprincipled villains. Some lawful evil people and creatures commit themselves to evil with a zeal like that of a crusader committed to good.

Beyond being willing to hurt others for their own ends, they take pleasure in spreading evil as an end unto itself. They may also see doing evil as part of a duty to an evil deity or master. Lawful evil is sometimes called “diabolical,” because devils are the epitome of lawful evil.

Neutral Evil, “Malefactor”: A neutral evil villain does whatever he or she can get away with. He or she is out for him- or herself, pure and simple. He or she sheds no tears for those he or she kills, whether for profit, sport, or convenience. He or she has no love of order and holds no illusion that following laws, traditions, or codes would make him or her any better or more noble. On the other hand, he or she doesn't have the restless nature or love of conflict that a chaotic evil villain has. Some neutral evil villains hold up evil as an ideal, committing evil for its own sake. Most often, such villains are devoted to evil deities or secret societies.

Chaotic Evil, “Destroyer”: A chaotic evil character does whatever his or her greed, hatred, and lust for destruction drive him to do. He or she is hot-tempered, vicious, arbitrarily violent, and unpredictable. If he or she is simply out for whatever he or she can get, he or she is ruthless and brutal. If he or she is committed to the spread of evil and chaos, he or she is even worse. His or her plans may be worked out well in advance, but their implementation will often be haphazard, and any group he or she forms is likely to be poorly organised.

Typically, chaotic evil creatures can be made to work together only by force, and their leader lasts only as long as he or she can thwart attempts to topple or assassinate him or her. Chaotic evil is sometimes called “demonic” because demons are the epitome of chaotic evil. Chaotic evil represents the destruction not only of beauty and life but also of the order on which beauty and life depend.

Money

In OSRIC, coins are heavy. Ten coins weigh one lbs. They are also of primary importance when keeping track of character experience, since gold the party recovers is converted to experience at the rate of 1gp = 1xp. (The GM may well wish to reduce the experience point award for gold if large amounts are gained for relatively small risk.) OSRIC prices normally far exceed prices as they were in the real mediæval world. Gold is plentiful and hence of relatively little value. The purpose of this is to allow GMs to place the kinds of treasure mentioned in works of fantasy literature—huge piles of gold, enormous gems and pieces of beautiful jewellery—without destroying the fantasy economy of his or her game.

A fundamental, driving assumption of OSRIC-compatible games is that the player characters are, at least partially, motivated by a desire (or need) for wealth. This need not necessarily be for reasons of greed; a cleric or paladin character, for example, could be driven to acquire money to donate to the poor, or to enable his or her superiors to construct a new church. However this is managed, the mechanics of the game specifically reward the acquisition of money, and so successful players will tend to find an awful lot of it!

Shrewd GMs will usually use all the tools at their disposal to ensure that while a lot of money flows through the players' hands, other pressures will keep their expenses high. In particular, training costs (see Chapter 3) will absorb the majority of the characters' income during the early levels. If any players are skilled and fortunate enough that their characters survive to higher levels, they will find that the construction and maintenance of a stronghold also creates a great strain on the purse; while creating magic items is more expensive still.

This constant drive for money should serve to motivate the player characters to explore dark dungeons, seek dragons' hoards and otherwise constantly quest for wealth!

OSRIC games normally use the following conversion rate for currency. Of course, a GM's specific campaign may change this, but in this case the GM should consider revising the price lists provided in the following section.

1 platinum piece = 5 gold pieces 1 gold piece = 2 electrum pieces 1 gold piece = 10 silver pieces 1 gold piece = 100 copper pieces

Each character begins the game with a certain amount of money to buy initial equipment—how much depends on the character's class. Clerics and druids receive 30-180gp (3d6×10); fighters, rangers and paladins receive 50-200gp ((3d6+2)×10); magic users and illusionists receive 20-80gp (2d4×10), while thieves and assassins receive 20-120gp (2d6×10). Multi-class individuals receive the award for the wealthiest of their classes (thus, a fighter/thief would receive the starting money of a fighter, while a cleric/magic user would receive the starting money of a cleric).

Equipment

The following table shows suggested general equipment prices for a typical campaign. Players should check with their GM whether the prices show below apply in his or her specific campaign.

Equipment Cost

Item Weight (in gp) Cost
Ale, pint 1 1 sp
Backpack 10 (empty) 2 gp
Barrel 30 (empty) 2 gp
Bedroll 5 2 sp
Bell 1 gp
Belt 5 sp
Blanket, woollen 2 5 cp
Block and tackle 5 5 gp
Boots, soft 3 1 gp
Boots, heavy 5 2 gp
Bottle (wine), glass 1 2 gp
Box (empty) 15 1 gp
Bracer, leather (archery) 1 8 sp
Caltrops 2 1 gp
Candle, beeswax 1 cp
Canvas (per sq. yd) 1 1 sp
Cauldron and tripod 15 2 gp
Chain (per 10-ft) 10 30 gp
Chalk, piece 1 cp
Chest (empty) 25 2 gp
Cloak 2 3 cp
Crowbar 5 2 gp
Dice, bone, pair 5 sp
Dice, loaded, pair 5 gp
Doublet, linen 1 3 gp
Firewood (per day) 20 1 cp
Fish hook 1 sp
Fishing net (per 25 sq.ft) 1 sp
Flask (leather) 3 cp
Flint and steel 1 gp
Gloves, kidskin, pair ½ 3 gp
Gown, woolen 1 5 cp
Gown, linen 1 3 gp
Gown, silk 1 50+ gp
Grappling hook 4 1 gp
Hammer (tool, not war) 2 5 sp
Holy symbol, silver 1 25 gp
Holy symbol, pewter 1 5 gp
Holy symbol, wooden 1 6 sp
Horse, cart N/A 15 gp
Horse, nag N/A 8 gp
Horse, palfrey N/A 40+ gp
Horse, rouncey N/A 25 gp
Horse, war, heavy N/A 500+ gp
Horse, war, light N/A 200+ gp
Horse, war, medium N/A 350+ gp
Hose 1 gp
Iron spikes, dozen 5 1 gp
Ladder (per 10-ft) 20 5 sp
Lamp (bronze) 1 1 sp
Lantern, bullseye 3 12 gp
Lantern, hooded 2 7 gp
Lock 1 20+ gp
Manacles 2 15 gp
Mirror (small steel) ½ 20 gp
Mirror (small silver) ½ 45 gp
Mule N/A 18 gp
Musical instrument 1+ 5+ gp
Needle and thread 3 cp
Oil (lamp) (per pint) 1 1 sp
Ox N/A 15 gp
Parchment (per sheet) 2 sp
Pin (cloak) 4 sp
Piton ½ 1 sp
Pole (per 10-ft) 8 2 sp
Pony N/A 12 gp
Pot, iron 10 5 sp
Pouch, belt, large 2 (empty) 4 sp
Shoes, common 1 5 sp
Shoes, noble 1 30+ gp
Pouch, belt, small 1 (empty) 2 sp
Shovel 8 2 gp
Quill (pen) 1 sp
Signal whistle 8 sp
Quiver (holds 12 arrows) 1 (empty) 1 gp
Skillet 5 1 gp
Quiver (holds 24 arrows) 2 (empty) 25 sp
Soap (per lb) 1 5 sp
Quiver (holds 12 bolts) 1 (empty) 12 sp
Spell book (blank) 5 25 gp
Quiver (holds 24 bolts) 2 (empty) 3 gp
Tent 20 10 gp
Rations, standard (per day) 2 2 gp
Thieves' Tools 1 30 gp
Rations, trail (per day) 1 6 gp
Torch 1 1 cp
Reins, bit and bridle 5 2 gp
Tunic, woollen 1 5 cp
Robe, linen 1 3 gp
Tunic, banqueting 1 10+ gp
Robe, silk 1 60+ gp
Twine, linen (per 100-ft) ½ 8 cp
Rope, hemp (per 50-ft) 10 1 gp
Vellum (per sheet) 3 sp
Rope, silk (per 50-ft) 5 10 gp
Wagon, small N/A 100 gp
Sack, small ½ (empty) 9 cp
Wagon, large N/A 250 gp
Sack, large 1 (empty) 15 cp
Water, holy (per vial) ½ 25 gp
Saddle and stirrups 20 10 gp
Waterskin (3 pint) 1 (empty) 1 gp
Satchel 5 (empty) 1 gp
Whetstone ½ 2 cp
Scrollcase, bone ½ 4 gp
Wine, pint 1 5 sp
Scrollcase, leather ½ 1 gp

Master Weapon Table

Weapon type Damage vs S or M Damage vs L Encumbrance Cost
Arrows 1d6 1d6 4 (per dozen) 2 gp (per dozen)
Axe, battle 1d8 1d8 7 5 gp
Axe, hand 1d6 1d4 5 1 gp
Bolt, heavy crossbow 1d6+1 1d6+1 4 (per dozen) 4 gp (per dozen)
Bolt, light crossbow 1d4+1 1d4+1 2 (per dozen) 2 gp (per dozen)
Club 1d4 1d3 3 2 cp
Dagger 1d4 1d3 1 2 gp
Dart 1d3 1d2 ½ 2 sp
Flail, heavy 1d6+1 2d4 10 3 gp
Flail, light 1d4+1 1d4+1 4 6 gp
Halberd 1d10 2d6 18 9 gp
Hammer, war, heavy 1d6+1 1d6 10 7 gp
Hammer, war, light 1d4+1 1d4 5 1 gp
Javelin* 1d6 1d4 4 5 sp
Lance* 2d4+1 3d6 15 6 gp
Mace, heavy 1d6+1 1d6 10 10 gp
Mace, light 1d4+1 1d4+1 5 4 gp
Morning star 2d4 1d6+1 12 5 gp
Pick, heavy 1d6+1 2d4 10 8 gp
Pick, light 1d4+1 1d4 4 5 gp
Pole arm* 1d6+1 1d10 8 6 gp
Sling bullet 1d4+1 1d6+1 4 (per dozen) 1 gp (per dozen)
Sling stone 1d4 1d4 2 (per dozen) Free
Spear* 1d6 1d8 5 1 gp
Staff 1d6 1d6 5 Free
Sword, claymore/bastard 2d4 2d8 10 25 gp
Sword, broad 2d4 1d6+1 8 10 gp
Sword, long 1d8 1d12 7 15 gp
Sword, scimitar 1d8 1d8 5 15 gp
Sword, short 1d6 1d8 3 8 gp
Sword, two-handed 1d10 3d6 25 30 gp
Trident* 1d6+1 3d4 5 4 gp

* Long-hafted, pointed weapons, such as the spear, lance (when used dismounted), pole arm, or trident, inflict double damage when set to receive a charge and the foe actually charges. The lance inflicts double damage when used by a character riding a charging heavy warhorse or similar animal; if the attacker is mounted on a normal riding or cavalry horse, the damage should be reduced.

Missile Weapon Table

Weapon Type Damage vs S or M Damage vs L Rate of Fire (in shots/ round) Range (-2 “to hit”/ increment) Encumbrance Cost
Axe, hand 1d6 1d4 1 10-ft 5 1 gp
Bow, long† 1d6 1d6 2 70-ft 12 60 gp
Bow, short† 1d6 1d6 2 50-ft 8 15 gp
Club 1d4 1d3 1 10-ft 3 2 cp
Composite bow, long† 1d6 1d6 2 60-ft 13 100 gp
Composite bow, short† 1d6 1d6 2 50-ft 9 75 gp
Crossbow, heavy* 1d6+1 1d6+1 ½ 60-ft 12 20 gp
Crossbow, light 1d4+1 1d4+1 1 60-ft 4 12 gp
Dagger 1d4 1d4 2 10-ft 1 2 gp
Dart 1d3 1d2 3 15-ft ½ 2 sp
Hammer 1d4+1 1d4 1 10-ft 5 1 gp
Javelin 1d6 1d4 1 20-ft 2 5 sp
Sling 1d4+1 or 1d4 1d6+1 or 1d4 1 35-ft ½ 5 sp
Spear 1d6 1d8 1 15-ft 5 1 gp

* Heavy crossbows may not be used from horseback; only a footman can brace them correctly before firing.

† Some specially-made bows (sold at special cost if at all—GM's discretion) permit the user to add his or her strength bonus to damage inflicted with the weapon. Otherwise the strength damage bonus with missile weapons is restricted to hurled weapons (axes, hammers, clubs, darts, javelins and spears).

Armour

Armour Table 1

Armour Type Encumbrance* Max Move Rate Effect on AC (base AC 10) Cost
Banded 35 lbs 90-ft -6 90 gp
Mail hauberk or byrnie (chain) 30 lbs 90-ft -5 75 gp
Mail, elfin (chain) 15 lbs 120-ft -5 Not sold
Leather 15 lbs 120-ft -2 5 gp
Padded gambeson 10 lbs 90-ft -2 4 gp
Plate 45 lbs 60-ft -7 400 gp
Ring 35 lbs 90-ft -3 30 gp
Scale or lamellar 40 lbs 60-ft -4 45 gp
Shield, large 10 lbs N/A -1 15 gp
Shield, medium 8 lbs N/A -1 12 gp
Shield, small 5 lbs N/A -1 10 gp
Splint 40 lbs 60-ft -6 80 gp
Studded 20 lbs 90-ft -3 15 gp

* For non-magic armour. Magic armour is un-encumbering, and allows a maximum move rate 30-ft faster than normal (up to 120-ft). Magic shields weigh as much as normal shields of the same type.

Armour Table 2

Type of Armour AC Rating
None 10
Shield only 9
Leather or padded armour 8
Studded leather or ring 7
Scale or lamellar 6
Mail hauberk or byrnie 5
Banded or splint 4
Plate 3

The AC rating of a character employing a shield is improved by 1, so a character wearing leather armour and carrying a shield would be AC 7, while a character with plate armour and shield would be AC 2. Magic armour with a rating of +1 reduces AC by 1, +2 reduces by 2, and so forth; the principle is that a positive rating for a magic item shows that it is beneficial, but AC is rated on a descending scale whereby the lower the figure, the better the protection.

Shields do NOT affect armour class where the target is being attacked from the rear. Likewise, a figure attacked by several opponents may only employ the shield against one (in the case of a small shield), two (in the case of a medium shield) or three (for a large shield) attacks in any one given round; thus AC against multiple opponents will tend to deteriorate.

This table should not be used to extrapolate monster armour types. These are assigned rather than calculated. For example, most hobgoblins are AC 5, but this does not mean that the hobgoblin will automatically be wearing chain mail armour worth 75gp! More than likely, the creature is wearing a mishmash of assorted pieces of armour of negligible value, but its armour class is considered to be 5 owing to its combat skill and the needs of the game system.

Field plate is optional, and rather anachronistic (and hence not listed on the standard tables). It means the Gothic and Milanese plate of the fifteenth century or later. If field plate is used in a campaign, it should be treated as having an AC modifier of -8 (i.e. field plate plus shield would be equivalent to AC 1) and a maximum movement rate of 90-ft. Some GMs may also wish to permit full plate, representing the jousting or tourney plate of the same period and later, which should be treated as having an AC modifier of -9 and a maximum movement rate of 60-ft.

Elfin mail counts as normal (chain) mail except for the purposes of weight calculation and encumbrance. It is rarely sold, but suits are occasionally fashioned by elven master craftsmen as gifts for those who have performed some great service for the elven race. 99% of them are awarded to elves, the majority of the remainder to humans or half-elves. Dwarf-sized or smaller suits are prohibitively rare.

Druids are restricted to armour that does not contain metal. They are permitted leather (optionally studded leather at the GM's discretion) and shields not bound with metal. A wooden shield bound with rawhide costs the same, and has the same characteristics, as a small shield.

Thieves are restricted to leather or padded armour. Some kindly GMs permit thieves to use studded leather or elfin mail.

Normally, plate gauntlets and helms must be removed before missile weapons such as bows can be employed.

Some GMs and/or players like to assign their character's height and weight from the character's ability scores and background, and others do not bother with them. These are perfectly acceptable approaches. Some groups prefer to use random tables for these things, and for these groups, the following tables are provided.

Height and Weight (Optional Rule)

Dwarf Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-10 Small 3-ft 9-in+1d4 in 130 lbs+1d20 lbs
11-25 Slim 4-ft 1-in+1d4 in 140 lbs+1d20 lbs
26-55 Normal 4-ft 2-in+1d4 in 150 lbs+1d20 lbs
56-85 Stout 4-ft 2-in+1d4 in 160 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 4-ft 6-in+1d4 in 160 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 4-ft 9-in+1d4 in 170 lbs+1d20 lbs

Dwarf Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 3-ft 7-in+1d4 in 100 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-30 Svelte 3-ft 11-in+1d4 in 110 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-65 Normal 4-ft 0-in+1d4 in 120 lbs+1d20 lbs
66-85 Curvy 4-ft 0-in+1d4 in 130 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 4-ft 4-in+1d4 in 130 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 4-ft 7-in+1d4 in 140 lbs+1d20 lbs

Elf Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Small 4-ft 7-in+1d4 in 70 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-45 Slim 4-ft 11-in+1d4 in 80 lbs+1d20 lbs
46-75 Normal 5-ft 0-in+1d4 in 90 lbs+1d20 lbs
76-80 Stout 5-ft 0-in+1d4 in 95 lbs+1d20 lbs
81-95 Tall 5-ft 4-in+1d4 in 95 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 5-ft 7-in+1d4 in 100 lbs+1d20 lbs

Elf Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 4-ft 3-in+1d4 in 64 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-45 Svelte 4-ft 7-in+1d4 in 72 lbs+1d20 lbs
46-75 Normal 4-ft 8-in+1d4 in 80 lbs+1d20 lbs
76-80 Curvy 4-ft 8-in+1d4 in 85 lbs+1d20 lbs
81-95 Tall 5-ft 0-in+1d4 in 85 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 5-ft 3-in+1d4 in 90 lbs+1d20 lbs

Gnome or Halfling Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-10 Small 2-ft 10-in+1d3 in 50 lbs+1d20 lbs
11-25 Slim 3-ft 1-in+1d3 in 55 lbs+1d20 lbs
26-55 Normal 3-ft 2-in+1d3 in 60 lbs+1d20 lbs
56-85 Stout 3-ft 2-in+1d3 in 65 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 3-ft 5-in+1d3 in 65 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 3-ft 7-in+1d3 in 70 lbs+1d20 lbs

Gnome or Halfling Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 2-ft 8-in+1d3 in 42 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-30 Svelte 2-ft 11-in+1d3 in 45 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-65 Normal 3-ft 0-in+1d3 in 50 lbs+1d20 lbs
66-85 Curvy 3-ft 0-in+1d3 in 55 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 3-ft 3-in+1d3 in 55 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 3-ft 5-in+1d3 in 60 lbs+1d20 lbs

Half-Elf Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-10 Small 5-ft 1-in+1d4 in 105 lbs+1d20 lbs
11-30 Slim 5-ft 5-in+1d4 in 115 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-70 Normal 5-ft 6-in+1d4 in 125 lbs+1d20 lbs
71-80 Stout 5-ft 6-in+1d4 in 135 lbs+1d20 lbs
81-95 Tall 5-ft 10-in+1d4 in 135 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 6-ft 1-in+1d4 in 145 lbs+1d20 lbs

Half-Elf Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 4-ft 9-in+1d4 in 80 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-30 Svelte 5-ft 1-in+1d4 in 90 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-65 Normal 5-ft 2-in+1d4 in 100 lbs+1d20 lbs
66-85 Curvy 5-ft 2-in+1d4 in 110 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 5-ft 6-in+1d4 in 110 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 5-ft 9-in+1d4 in 120 lbs+1d20 lbs

Half-Orc Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-10 Small 5-ft 3-in+1d4 in 130 lbs+1d20 lbs
11-25 Slim 5-ft 7-in+1d4 in 140 lbs+1d20 lbs
26-55 Normal 5-ft 8-in+1d4 in 150 lbs+1d20 lbs
56-85 Stout 5-ft 8-in+1d4 in 165 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 6-ft 0-in+1d4 in 160 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 6-ft 3-in+1d4 in 170 lbs+1d20 lbs

Half-Orc Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 4-ft 10-in+1d4 in 100 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-30 Svelte 5-ft 2-in+1d4 in 110 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-65 Normal 5-ft 3-in+1d4 in 120 lbs+1d20 lbs
66-85 Curvy 5-ft 3-in+1d4 in 135 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 5-ft 7-in+1d4 in 130 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 5-ft 10-in+1d4 in 140 lbs+1d20 lbs

Human Male

d% Description Height Weight
01-10 Small 5-ft 4-in+1d4 in 140 lbs+1d20 lbs
11-30 Slim 5-ft 8-in+1d4 in 155 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-70 Normal 5-ft 9-in+1d4 in 170 lbs+1d20 lbs
71-80 Stout 5-ft 9-in+1d4 in 185 lbs+1d20 lbs
81-95 Tall 6-ft 1-in+1d4 in 185 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 6-ft 4-in+1d4 in 200 lbs+1d20 lbs

Human Female

d% Description Height Weight
01-15 Petite 4-ft 11-in+1d4 in 105 lbs+1d20 lbs
16-30 Svelte 5-ft 3-in+1d4 in 115 lbs+1d20 lbs
31-65 Normal 5-ft 4-in+1d4 in 125 lbs+1d20 lbs
66-85 Curvy 5-ft 4-in+1d4 in 135 lbs+1d20 lbs
86-95 Tall 5-ft 8-in+1d4 in 135 lbs+1d20 lbs
96-00 Outsize 5-ft 11-in+1d4 in 145 lbs+1d20 lbs

These tables provide base height and weight. Then roll 1d6; on a “1”, subtract 1d4 in and 1d20 lbs, and re-roll. On a “6”, add 1d4 in and 1d20 lbs, and re-roll. Continue rolling until a 2, 3, 4, or 5 appears. Discard any nonsensical results.

1)
Infravision is defined under Light and Vision
2)
For the purposes of starting age, for all races, treat assassins as thieves, illusionists as magic users, druids as clerics, and paladins and rangers as fighters.
osric/chapter1.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/25 17:59 by robertfreemanday